need something to plant under big maple tree

Page 2 of 2  


Vinca minor is a very close-to-the-ground very little groundcover. Vinca major is a bigger versioin; it will have YOUNG upright branches but these soon become long ground vines. Both V. minor & major can be invasive if they like where they're at.
There are at least three variegated forms of Vinca major on the market this season, & I these should make a lovely under-a-maple vine (vincas dislike much sunlight), & the variegated forms would be slightly less aggressive but still very easy plants, a very nice option to ivy. The flowers on V. major are usually just various shades of light to dark blue. Vinca minor has white, blue, & burgundy flowering varieties, & among the variegated forms of that 'Illumination' is the brightest.
Ivy may seem like a tedious predictable choice but if you contact an ivy specialist you will have choices of ivys that are fantastic choices with distinctive traits; the dwarf English ivies with variegation and/or curly leaves are not invasive like big boring regular ivy.
-paghat the ratgirl
--
Get your Paghat the Ratgirl T-Shirt here:
http://www.paghat.com/giftshop.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I appreciate the suggestions. I've had vinca on the west side of my house and it's done very well every year so maybe it would do well in the back under the tree.
Pat
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No doubt there is some plants you can grow that don't need light or moisture, but I'm at a loss to think of any.
However, what I really think I should tell you is that whenever possible, it's never a good idea to plant anything beneath trees as the plants and the tree roots compete for the moisture (very little, usually) and nutrients, and the trees lose out. This publication from the Morton Arboretum (Chicago area) has a great picture showing the difference between tree roots where grass is planted compared to where there's only mulch: http://www.mortonarb.org/research/treeroots.html .
Hope this helps!
Suzy in Wisconsin, Zone 5
"The way to avoid housework is to live outside." -Sandra Blacksmith, 1901

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well if it wasn't so much of my yard I wouldn't bother. But it looks so unsightly. Pat
S Orth wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PatK wrote:

Maybe some garden art, and some clusters of container plants. You could even get sun-loving color spots in the containers, if you rotate them in and out. Get an old wheelbarrow or two, and put stuff in them. And top it all off with a hammock on a stand.
--
Warren H.

==========
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.