narcissus bulb question

Daughter in law gave us a few forced narcissus bulbs for the holidays. When flowers are gone can these be planted outside, Northern DE? If so, at what point? Crockett Victory Garden book says he just adds them to compost but wife wants to grow outside.
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On Sunday, December 28, 2014 6:54:45 PM UTC-5, Frank wrote:

I've planted them before and they do survive. They probably won't bloom in spring though possibly in the following spring.
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On 12/29/2014 11:17 AM, Steve Peek wrote:

Thanks, will try then. White blossoms really stink and wife thinks outside they may keep deer away.
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On 12/29/2014 8:17 AM, Steve Peek wrote:

I have had mixed results.
Many years ago, I forced 'Soleil d'Or' in a bowl of very small pebbles. They were great. As soon as they finished blooming, I put them in my garden (note my climate in my signature block). They have bloomed again every year; they are blooming right now.
Many years ago, I forced 'Paper White' in a bowl of very small pebbles. They were great. As soon as they finished blooming, I put them in my garden. The foliage comes up every year. Instead of flowers, however, I get deformed flower buds that never seem to show actual flowers or have that delightful narcissus perfume. I tried moving the bulbs, but that did not fix the problem. I tried removing them entirely, but there always seem to be a few bulbs that I missed.
In Frank's climate (northern Delaware), I would keep the bulbs indoors until the danger of snow and freeze is past. They should be kept growing in strong, indirect sunlight (perhaps a northern window). When spring arrives and the soil can be dug, lift the bulbs from their current container and gently shake away whatever growing medium they had. As tall as the bulbs are, that much soil should be above them; that is, the base of each bulb should be twice as deep as the bulb is tall. Dig the planting hole even deeper, stir some bone meal into the bottom of the hole, and then cover that with a little more soil so the bulb is not in direct contact with the fertilizer. If possible, separate the bulbs and plant them about 3-5 inches apart.
Do not remove any foliage until it yellows and dies. If the foliage is still green after six weeks in the ground, apply a light dose of fertilizer -- NOT MiracleGrow; a very small amount of a general lawn food -- without herbicide -- is good.
I hope Frank has the same results as I have with 'Soleil d'Or' and not the frustration I have with 'Paper White'. By the way, I have other narcissus in my garden, none of which were forced to bloom indoors. I have 'Mt. Hood', 'Spencer Tracy', 'Peeping Tom', 'February Gold' (usually blooming in January), and 'Tete-a-Tete'. For some reason, the common 'King Alfred' does not like me and refuses to survive.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
  Click to see the full signature.
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On 12/29/2014 3:16 PM, David E. Ross wrote:

Thanks. That completes answer to my question. Bulbs were forced in pebbles as a project by daughter in law's school class. She teaches natural science at an agricultural charter grade school.
Very nice but stinky flowers. I put them in a north facing basement window.
Frank Frank
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They're not nearly as stinky as my Bradford pears.
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