My redbud problem? ? ?

Earlier today I posted an inquiry about how to get rid of a weed which my wife calls a redbud, but I don't think that's right. Others think it may be Japanese knotweed.
I have put together a small web page which shows a photo of the weed. I welcome anyone to have a look and see if you can advise me. The link is as follows:
http://mysite.verizon.net/vze4xpgq/weed/weed.html
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'Twas probably my fault but I could not retrieve the picture. Just your words and a blank page of pop-up bathing costumes.!! Best Wishes Brian 'flayb' to respond.

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Thanks Brian -- That's peculiar. I clicked the link, and it opened right away.
Are you using Internet Explorer browser? I find that sometimes Netscape Mozilla won't open pages correctly.
-- Ray

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On Fri, 30 Apr 2004 00:19:40 GMT, "Ray Jenkins"

That's because it's reading it from your computer. Look at the path to your image file: file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/Owner/Desktop/weed/weed.jpg You need to put your photo on your web server, and link from it there.
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wrote:

Found it:
http://mysite.verizon.net/vze4xpgq/weed/weed.jpg
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Appears to be one of the Polygonum weeds (aka smartweed, mexican bamboo, japanese knotweed, mile-a-minute weed). These noxious weeds are in the buckwheat family and are annuals. Control can be achieved by persistent pulling and mowing to keep them from going to seed. sed5555
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Do you recognize the weed?

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Now that I can see the image, it is defintely Japanese knotweed, Polygonum cuspidatum. This is not an annual but a perennial weed that can become shrubby in time. Pulling is not the answer - you can actually increase its spread by inadvertantly leaving portions of the root rhizomes either above or underground. This is a plant that calls for and responds to herbicide applications, typically repeat applications. As mentioned previously, control is not easy, but you don't appear to have a huge problem.....yet. This link may help:
http://www.co.clark.wa.us/weed/documents/knotweed.pdf
pam - gardengal

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Japanese Knotweed can become a major problem if the eradication process is not sustained~~ even though I have known it to take four years with Roundup[The best]. Leave it untroubled and your only solution is to move house!! With us in SW England [Cornwall] it has become such a problem that the authorities have undertaken the spraying and have been many years in the process. It is also prohibited to dig up and disperse any parts of the plant. Even its ashes seem to have the ability to Phoenix!! I am relieved that others knew how to make a picture available. I have a scanner but beyond that I'm lost. Best Wishes Brian 'flayb' to respond.

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Posting web pages is fairly easy once you get the hang of it. You must first have an ISP (mine is Verizon) which gives you personal web space. The you need an editing tool -- Mozilla's Composer is good. And then you need SmartFTP for uploading and managing.
That photo was not scanned, by the way, but shot with my digital camera.

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And that's despite the fact that it doesn't spread by seed in the UK. The nation-wide infestation is supposed to have originated from one plant. It can erupt through concrete :-(
One of my sons moved into an Edinburgh tenement flat where the small walled garden was solid, head-high JK. It took four years, but we managed to eradicate it by first, chopping down and burning all the plants, then cutting off and destroying every single new stem as it emerged, **before it could develop any new leaves**.
Janet.
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Thanks Pam -- the web site looks good.
My problem is much worse than it looks. The main infestation is just behind the fence, in my neighbor's yard, and he seems to have no inclination to control it.

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I'd be very surprised if this was not considered a noxious weed where you are located - it is listed as such pretty well anywhere in the US that it grows. If so, your neighbor may be required to remove this pest. Contact your local authority with the responsibilty for controlling alien plant species - most likely the state department of agriculture.
http://www.fs.fed.us/na/morgantown/fhp/palerts/jknot/jknot.htm
pam - gardengal
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wrote:

I am currently battling this persistent weed. If this is all you have, get rid of it now, before its too late. I can't believe how hard it is to kill. I do admit that I was a bit lax last year, but I've learned my lesson. I'm starting early and will stay with it till its gone.
Swyck
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com expounded:

The best way to kill it is to hit it with Roundup right as it flowers. Then hit it again once more in 4-6 weeks. The following spring any stragglers can be picked off with a third application. This is one of the only plants I'll haul out the chemical guns for.
--
Ann, Gardening in zone 6a
Just south of Boston, MA
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Japanese Knotweed is a very variable plant. In Japan it is no more than a decorative plant frequently used in their gardens. Outside of Japan control will patently vary. A large clump locally has been cut to ground level at monthly intervals for about fifteen years and still persists though with less vigour than originally. In my daughter's garden we cut the stems to about 12" and filled the hollow stems with agricultural strength Roundup. It decreased annually and was gone after four years. Best Wishes.
expounded:

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It is everywhere around here, hubby and I were just taking a ride over in Scituate and I pointed it out along the road in many places. Fill dirt frequently has roots in it, and so it goes.
Four years? I'd rather be rid of it in two! <G>
--
Ann, Gardening in zone 6a
Just south of Boston, MA
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