Mountain Laurel Question

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Hi, I have a few transplanted Mountain Laurel plants (youngsters I've been growing since last Winter) outside in containers. How many months of dormancy is required before bringing them in and placing them under artificial light? I live in central Maryland.
thanks,
Mitch
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<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type"> <title></title> </head> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#009900"> <font face="Georgia">Hi, I have a few transplanted Mountain Laurel plants (youngsters I've been growing since last Winter) outside in containers.&nbsp; How many months of dormancy is required before bringing them in and placing them under artificial light?&nbsp; I live in central Maryland.<br> <br> thanks,<br> <br> Mitch<br> </font> </body> </html>
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What do you mean by dormancy here? I wouldn't leave them in containers to freeze solid to bring them in, is say, February. Why not bring them in now if you are going to grow under artificial lights anyway. Are these destined to become indoor plants?? If not, why not just plant the darned things and be done with it?? I have transplanted lots of these, usually dug from the wild. They usually do quite well - even mature plants. Good luck.
-- Mike LaMana, MS, CTE Consulting Forester & Arborist Heartwood Consulting Services, LLC Toms River, NJ www.HeartwoodConsulting.net
face=Georgia>Hi, I have a few transplanted Mountain Laurel plants (youngsters I've been growing since last Winter) outside in containers.&nbsp; How many months of dormancy is required before bringing them in and placing them under artificial light?&nbsp; I live in central Maryland.<BR><BR>thanks,<BR><BR>Mitch<BR></BLOCKQUOTE></FONT></BODY></HTML>
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Mike LaMana wrote:

I thought that they had a dormancy requirement? Are you saying that they can grow year round in a suitable environment?
I wanted to get some extra growth prior to planting them in beds. Too many animals here will mess with the small plants.
thanks
Mitch
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Yes, they can grow year round if placed indoors, under artificial lights. Think about it: If plants experience appropriate temperatures, daylength, and light frequencies (wavelengths) they have no way to know that it's winter out there and so, generally, keep right on a-growin'. Dormancy is a term used usually with seeds and germination for which, cold, heat, scarification may be required. Bring 'em in and grow the heck out of them, but make sure you plant them out early in spring and that you have equated your light periods with what they be encountering at this plant-out date. Mack you plant them in deep leaf-mold or other, similarly organic material. Good luck, and watch those damned deer. Mike
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Mike LaMana wrote:

Thanks alot for the info! I'll let them get larger in doors, then transplant them in the Spring time.
Mitch
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Mountain laurel are native to many different climates in the east, from New York to Georgia. If you have some from the wild in your region, (Maryland or wherever), they will be used to a cool/cold winter. They could live indoors under a grow light, but I'd put them somewhere cool, like an unheated garage, to simulate conditions they would experience in the outdoors. They don't need to freeze however, so just keeping them in a cool area should be adequate. The environment of a heated home is incredibly dry, with humidity levels of the Sahara desert, so most juicy evergreens are not too happy inside in winter.

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UGH!!!!
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UGH Yourself...it beats having them lost as the bulldozers roll over them. What have YOU done to conserve local genetic diversity lately, GrampysGurl??
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That is exactly how I got mine. A developer was bulldozing lots for houses. I got my mountain laurel from the mounds of dirt before it was hauled off. Raising local plants is great fun and has a purpose.
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What have YOU done to conserve local genetic diversity lately, GrampysGurl??
That would be my entire garden.
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<DIV><FONT face=Georgia>Hi, I have a few transplanted Mountain Laurel plants (youngsters I've been growing since last Winter) outside in containers.&nbsp; How many months of dormancy is required before bringing them in and placing them under artificial light?&nbsp; I live in central Maryland.<BR><BR>thanks,<BR><BR>Mitch</FONT></DIV><FONT face=Georgia></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE> <BLOCKQUOTE style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"><FONT face=Georgia><FONT face=Arial color=#000000 size=2>Mike, I also live in NJ and was under the impression it was illegal for us to move any Mountain Laurel shrubs. I was told many years ago they were endangered. Was I told worng and where can I find out for sure?</FONT> <DIV><BR></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BLOCKQUOTE></FONT></BODY></HTML>
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Bog laurel (K. polifolia) is endangered in NJ, not mountain laurel.
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<< > I also live in NJ and was under the impression it was illegal >for us to move any Mountain Laurel shrubs. I was told many years ago =

Bog laurel (K. polifolia) is endangered in NJ, not mountain laurel.
>><BR><BR> For more on mountain laurel, read Elinor Wylie's, "The Mountaineer's Ballad." zemedelec
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Mike, I also live in NJ and was under the impression it was illegal for us to move any Mountain Laurel shrubs. I was told many years ago they were endangered. Was I told wrong and where can I find out for sure?
\
I have no Idea where this urban legend came from...it's common in NY state as well. I have never seen a stature proscribing transplanting of Kalmia.
-- Mike LaMana, MS, CTE Consulting Forester & Arborist Heartwood Consulting Services, LLC Toms River, NJ www.HeartwoodConsulting.net
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face=Arial color=#000000 size=2> <BLOCKQUOTE style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"><FONT face=Georgia><FONT face=Arial color=#000000 size=2>Mike, I also live in NJ and was under the impression it was illegal for us to move any Mountain Laurel shrubs. I was told many years ago they were endangered. Was I told wrong and where can I find out for sure?</FONT> <DIV><BR></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE> <DIV></FONT>\</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>I have no Idea where this urban legend came from...it's common in NY state as well. I have never seen a stature proscribing transplanting of Kalmia.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><BR>-- <BR>Mike LaMana, MS, CTE<BR>Consulting Forester &amp; Arborist<BR>Heartwood Consulting Services, LLC<BR>Toms River, NJ<BR><A href="http://www.HeartwoodConsulting.net ">www.HeartwoodConsulting.net</A><BR></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE dir=ltr style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV>"</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial color=#000000 size=2>Me either but I thought it worth asking. Thanks much</FONT></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>
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It is not urban legend. In most states it is a violation of the state's Environmental Conservation Laws to collect or destroy plants without the permission of the landowner. These regulations gives landowners additional rights to prosecute people who collect plants without permission. Usually permission is construed to mean a receipt or other written form of permission.
New York lists its protected plants at:
http://www.dec.state.ny.us/website/dlf/privland/forprot/pnp/index.html
there are three Kalmia's on its list. Kalmia angustifolia SHEEP LAUREL Kalmia latifolia MOUNTAIN LAUREL Kalmia polifolia BOG LAUREL
New Jersey lists its protected plants at:
http://www.state.nj.us/dep/parksandforests/natural/endplants.html
the only one on its list is: KALMIA POLIFOLIA PALE-LAUREL
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Sounds like protection of plants as a form of private property, instead of a form of environmental stewardship, no?
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Mike LaMana, MS, CTE
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Actually it is much more aggressive. If some one steal your TV you have to pursue it, file charges, etc. If someone steals you Kalmia, the DER will pursue it.
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