moldy grass clippings..

Hi all!
I was saving some grass clippings for mulch and discovered this morning that they were very wet and moldy. (yes, lesson learned) I am assuming that it is NOT a good idea to use moldy grass clippings for mulch, right?
Also, do I put a nice thick layer of grass clipping mulch around my red onion plants? wasn't sure about this.
Thanks!!
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coykiesaol


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coykiesaol wrote:

Why? If you put it on dry as soon as it gets wet it will go mouldy.

I mulch everything in sight
D
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coykiesaol;925955 Wrote: > Hi all!

> that they were very wet and moldy. (yes, lesson learned) I am assuming > that it is NOT a good idea to use moldy grass clippings for mulch, > right?

> onion plants? wasn't sure about this. No, don't use rotting fresh grass clippings as mulch, they won't be very good for your plants.
If you want to use grass clippings as mulch, you need to dry the grass thoroughly first so that it doesn't form a rotting mess, which will happen within a few hours if you pile them in a heap. The best procedure is to cut the lawn without a grass collector on the mower, so they lie on the lawn spread out to dry. Then you can rake them up and they shouldn't form a rotting mess. Unfortunately, this is a lot more work than gathering them in a hopper as you mow and chucking them away. Also it isn't a good idea if your grass is very long, as it will be thick enough to make a rotting mess on your lawn.
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echinosum


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Make that 1 part green to 25 parts brown.

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- Billy

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90% of the clippings consist of water.
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rikv


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rikv wrote:

I don't think that's true... by weight freshly mowed grass clippings consist of more like 98% water, but depending on conditions that water can evaporate rather quickly. If one plans to use grass clippings as mulch it's best to mow on a hot dry day after the morning dew has disapated and then leave the clipping to dry where they fall and raked up the next day. When clippings are bagged as they're mowed they will mold rather quickly. Personally I don't think grass clipping make for a very good mulch, they won't prevent weeds (in fact will encourage weeds), they are very poor at keeping soil moist, they encourage insects, and they become moldy much too easily. Grass clippings are best left on the lawn where they will become fertilzer (use a mulching blade).
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If one affairs to use grass clippings as mulch it's best to mow on a hot dry day afterwards the morning dew has disapated and again leave the abridgement to dry area they abatement and raked up the next day. When clippings are bagged as they're mowed they will mold rather quickly.
--
markenejackson

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On Thu, 30 Jun 2011 23:56:48 +0000, markenejackson <markenejackson> wrote:

Mow with a mulching blade and there'll be no raking. Grass clippings make terrible mulch anyway, grass clippings are too fine and decompose too rapidly to make a weed blocking mulch. Grass clippings actually encourage weed growth, and the thicker it's piled the better the more noxious weeds will grow... grass clipping are like potting soil for weeds... that's the main reason why I brush hog my wildflower meadow each fall.
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markenejackson <markenejackson> wrote:

Please, if English is a newly acquired language for you, disregard the following comments, if not, learn English. Even pigeon-English is preferable to the mismatched buggerage that you've put on display.
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wrote:

Actually that's better English than most found on usenet, albiet poetically flowery and verbose... unfortunately for you your guttersnipe's upbringing and the fourth grade education you attained prevents you from knowing and appreciating.
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coykiesaol said

Start a compost pile. Google around for the ratio of greens/browns as poster had already alluded to. I compost all my leaves, kitchen scraps (veggies), garden trimmings etc. It's simply amazing how little work it is, how much the mass is reduced, and what comes out... simply sweet. Turn in into the soil next spring and you'll have loam people die for.
Your prob is going to be browns.... maybe add the shreadings from your paper shredder?
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wrote:

Spread thinly between plants as soon as you finish mowing; the clippings will dry quickly and won't get moldy this way. If you put a thick layer down it will mat down so much that water can't get through. You can add a thin layer each week when you mow.
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