Linden tree?

I live in Wisconsin ,Is a Linden tree a desirable tree ,I just had a Norway maple cut down because of girdling roots,and now my yard looks naked.Thanks
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infested with aphids, which drip sap all under the tree. Even so, they're common street and park trees.
One of the positive features is the scent (if you like it) of the flowers. The strongest scented (to my nose) of the commonly grown forms is the Silver Lime, Tilia tomentosa (a fastigiate form is 'Brabant', and a weeping form is 'Petiolaris'), tho' I'm not familiar with Basswood (Tilia americana).
--
Stewart Robert Hinsley

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I should be clear that I don't know whether this would be hardy in Wisconsin.
--
Stewart Robert Hinsley

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Yes, a very desirable shade tree. Hardy from Zones 3b to 7. (Tilia cordata).
--
David J. Bockman, Fairfax, VA (USDA Hardiness Zone 7)
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On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 14:02:41 GMT, David Bockman

Planting Tilia cordata may give him a tree with poor branch structure, better to make an informed recommendation.
Tilia cordata 'Greenspire' has improved branching habits, or consider Tilia X 'Redmond'
Acts of creation are ordinarily reserved for gods and poets. To plant a pine, one need only own a shovel. -- Aldo Leopold
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Better to make a truly informed recommendation. 'Greenspire' is much more susceptible to sunscalding and loose bark associated with 'weedwacker damage' or when hedged. Have a nice day Tom,
--
David J. Bockman, Fairfax, VA (USDA Hardiness Zone 7)
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On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 16:59:42 GMT, David Bockman

I am having a very nice fall day, thanks!
Acts of creation are ordinarily reserved for gods and poets. To plant a pine, one need only own a shovel. -- Aldo Leopold
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] I live in Wisconsin ,Is a Linden tree a desirable tree ,I just had a Norway ] maple cut down because of girdling roots,and now my yard looks naked.Thanks ]
Certainly a very desirable tree, a Linden, commonly Tilia Cordata, may get large -- to 30 m and a pretty fast grower.
Sweet smelling flowers attract bees, and make a very nice tea. We give Linden flowers each year as gifts. Good shade, nice yellow fall color.
Drawbacks are it suckers freely, does not withstand wind well, (a lot of breakage) and the seed pods make a big mess to clean up.
-E
--
Emery Davis
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My understanding is that linden blossom tea is the same lime bloosom tea whosescent, along with some madeleines, gave Proust his remembrance of things past.
--
What use was it having all that money if you could never sit still
or just watch your cattle eating grass?
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[] ] My understanding is that linden blossom tea is the same lime bloosom ] tea whosescent, along with some madeleines, gave Proust his ] remembrance of things past. ]
I think so. For reasons that are obscure to me the British refer to the French Tillieul as 'Lime'. I've always called it Linden. 'Lime' has nothing to do with the citrus. Perhaps a Brit could explain it.
Anyway it makes excellent tea.
] -- ] What use was it having all that money if you could never sit still ] or just watch your cattle eating grass? ] - Alexander McCall Smith, _The No.1 Ladies' Detective Agency_
That's a good one, too! :)
-E
--
Emery Davis
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As I understand it, lime and linden are both developments (lind > line > lime) from the same Germanic root. Linden is archaic in British English. The use of lime for both Tilia and Citrus aurantifolia is coincidence; the latter usage is apparently borrowed from Arabic.
--
Stewart Robert Hinsley
http://www.malvaceae.info/Index/Vernacular/vernacular.php?genus=Tilia
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ The trees are generally called linden in North America, and lime in Britain. Both names are derived from the (A branch of the Indo-European family of languages; members that are spoken currently fall into two major groups: Scandinavian and West Germanic) Germanic root lind. The modern forms in English derive from linde or linne in Anglo Saxon and old Norse, and in Britain the word morphed more recently to the modern British form lime. In the United States, the modern (A person of German nationality) German name linden, from the same root, became more common, partly to avoid confusion with any other uses of the name. Neither the name nor the tree is in any way related to the citrus fruit called " (The green acidic fruit of any of various lime trees) lime" (Citrus aurantifolia). Best Wishes Brian a 'limey'!!
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On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 23:32:08 +0100, "Brian" < snipped-for-privacy@tiscali.co.uk--- 'flayb' to respond> said:
] The trees are generally called linden in North America, and lime in Britain. ] Both names are derived from the (A branch of the Indo-European family of ] languages; members that are spoken currently fall into two major groups: ] Scandinavian and West Germanic) Germanic root lind. The modern forms in ] English derive from linde or linne in Anglo Saxon and old Norse, and in ] Britain the word morphed more recently to the modern British form lime. In ] the United States, the modern (A person of German nationality) German name ] linden, from the same root, became more common, partly to avoid confusion ] with any other uses of the name. Neither the name nor the tree is in any way ] related to the citrus fruit called " (The green acidic fruit of any of ] various lime trees) lime" (Citrus aurantifolia).
Thanks both for the clarification.
-E
--
Emery Davis
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Hello, Tony,
I've read the other responses to your question and just have this to add .....
ALL maple trees can develop girdled roots if not planted properly. See the University of Wisconsin Extension bulletin on Maple Decline, which has some great photos of maple root problems: http://cecommerce.uwex.edu/pdfs/A2532.PDF .
As far as a linden or any other replacement, check out the UW Extension's Guide to Selecting Landscape Plants for Wisconsin: http://cecommerce.uwex.edu/pdfs/A2865.PDF . Lindens are listed on page 4.
Suzy O Milwaukee, WI, Zone 5 -- still summer weather and loving it!!
-- Plant questions? Call your local County Cooperative Extension office: http://www.csrees.usda.gov/Extension /. Milwaukee County: 414-290-2410.

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It is true that lindens sucker from the roots, and/or throw up branches nearly from the base of the tree. This is not necessarily a problem if you are diligent about rubbing out the new growth at the base of the tree as soon as it appears. Obviously, the longer you let it grow, the more unsightly it becomes and the more possibility of damage to the tree when you have to prune it. I have a very tall friend who has progressively pruned his lindens up as they have grown, so that he has room to mow underneath them. They are gorgeous. But their natural habit is not always as graceful as he has shaped his to be. The linden's two assets are fairly dense shade, and two/three weeks of gorgeously scented flowers. Tilia cordata has smaller leaves and tends to make denser growth and shade. Tilia American has larger leaves and is naturally a more open tree.

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