Lawns after Rhododendron removal

Hi,
Have just (mechanically) cleared 0.25 acres of old and impenetrabl rododendron, and having removed the roots, will rotovate and overla with 6" of soil/sand/loam mix before laying a new lawn.
However, I'm expecting some potential problems:
First, I'm aware that the rhododendron is toxic to other plants, an I'm trying to understand what may not be plantable in the reclaime land (ie. lawn, laurel, fruit trees etc). And also what might be don to neutralise this effect.
Second, I'm aware that there is likely to be rhododendron seeds left i the ground, which will doubtless sprout. Will glyphosate neutral these or do I require something different, and will that be fine to seed law in mid September.
Any help appreciated. Kind regards, David
-- Bosseye
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Bosseye wrote:

I don't know where you heard that Rhododendrons are toxic to other plants. I have many Rhodys planted next to other things and it is not a problem. I doubt the seeds will be a problem. If perchance a few do sprout the first mowing will take care of them for good.
--

Travis in Shoreline Washington

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Bosseye wrote:

This is a weak effect. I think with what you are doing, you will be OK. You are removing Rhododendron ponticum and it does has some allelopathic properties. They seem to inhibit germination of seedlings or the development of seedlings as reported in:
<http://www.countrysideinfo.co.uk/rhododen.htm

Glyphosate has no effect on seeds. It enters green tissue and poisons the roots. It works best on mature plants that are translocating sugars to the roots.

I doubt if you plant much seed under your rhododendrons. The allelopathy affects seedlings, not plants. There is current research showing that there is some evidence that some rhododendrons including R. ponticum and R. maximum are allelopathic. It seems to be a substance that inhibits the germination of competing seeds or prevents mycorrhizal development of competing roots. Junipers have a similar effect. I have noted that few weeds start under my rhododendrons or my junipers. References to current research:
<http://64.233.169.104/search?q Κche:IPuuGHtcGO4J:cwt33.ecology.uga.edu/ publications/1412.pdf+rhododendron+allelopathic&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=us& client=firefox-a>
<http://64.233.169.104/search?q Κche:Q2JZhii0o_4J:cwt33.ecology.uga.edu/ publications/122.pdf+rhododendron+allelopathic&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=2&gl=us&c lient=firefox-a>
<http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/full/86/11/1597
<http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/86/11/1597
<http://www.spri.cam.ac.uk/~ojm21/rhodo.htm
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Wow. Very interesting.
My first thought is that you apparently have soil which is good for plants of the heath family (cranberry, bilberry, heath, lingonberry aka cowberry, etc), so you could try a few of those.
I'm jealous. My soil is not acidic enough, so we try to amend it. Not sure how long we'll keep up trying, and when we'll give up.
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Do you have trees with their root zones in this area?
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Thanks to all the posters so far - I'm rather amazed at the response!
Actually, I do have tree root structures in this ground, principall three large oaks, and I would not wish to do anything do harm them. Also three holly. Why - is there something important I'm missing re the trees?
br/David
symplastless;739317 Wrote:

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Bosseye wrote:

It is probably not a good idea to be placing 6" of soil on top of any tree roots much less rototilling them.
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Travis in Shoreline Washington

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Thanks Travis,
The trees are at the edges of the land, and thankfully the edges tha will only need about 1" of soil to make the plot level (as a tilth i which to seed). Rotovating was an issue I'd considered, and ha planned to hoe the 6' around the trees by hand so as to avoid any roo damage. Is this adequate, or is there something else I should know? Again, much thanks, David.
Travis;739864 Wrote:

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Bosseye wrote:

I wouldn't plant anything within the drip line. If the Oaks are native they will get enough water from the sky but if you plant anything under them you will need to water and that might be too much for the Oaks.
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Travis in Shoreline Washington

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No one in Pennsylvania waters oak trees and everyone has something planted underneath. Oaks are a favorite shade tree for rhododendrons and azaleas. If people didn't plant under oaks, there would not be many rhododendron and azalea gardens left. Most parks have grass doing quite well under oaks. So, I think it depends upon what is planted under the oaks.
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It really depends upon where the oaks are. Oaks on the Pacific Coast have adapted to growing in a no summer rain, dry climate. If plants that need summer water are grown in the oak's root zone, the trees may eventually develop oak root fungus. (This is not always true with nursery grown trees that have grown up with watering). The best thing to grow under native oaks here is either nothing, or other dry adapted native plants. Emilie NorCal
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We have as much rain in summer as you do in winter so that is not a problem in the East. We have hot summers with frequent thunder storms. We expect about 3 to 4 inches of rain every month during the summer (and the rest of the year also). I am originally from Oregon, and people in the East kid about all the rain in the Pacific Northwest. But the fact is that we get more inches of rain in the East, just not as many days of rain. I am comparing New York and Philadelphia with Portland and Seattle. I know that the PNW has rain forests with more and arid portions with virtually none.
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Oh, I remember all the rain, thunder, and humidity..... I went from So Cal to Cleveland Ohio and lived there for 20 years. Now I'm back in Cal, but the north state, about 100 miles from OR We have fairly cold winters, with about 25-40 inches of rain, but it's still all in the winter. Oh, we did have .27 inch this July, very unusual. Emilie NorCal
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