Lawn Pest Problem

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Side trip: Here's a news story about how chemicals move underground and affect other people. Although this might be considered an extreme example because of the concentrations involved, it's really not. The EPA now considers homeowners and golf courses to be the worst offenders, in terms of contaminating groundwater with all sorts of chemicals. It used to be industry.
http://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070727/NEWS01/707270377/1002/NEWS
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That's quite frightening. I had been taking comfort in the idea, that the chemicals I was using on the lawn, would dissipate, after several days.
I think I recall reading once that Roundup only lasted in the environment 10 days or so.
I think I need to move to a desert, and just grow a few cactus;-). . .I've been a menace to mankind!
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Myrl wrote:

You realize there is a difference in chemicals..some, as in the article are used for dry cleaning and apparently move well through the soil where others are made to bind to the soil and not move so much for they wouldn't be very effective insecticides if they quickly moved off when put out...
Lar
Lar
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wrote:

Thanks. Yes, I realize they are different types of chemicals.
Tell me, then, why agricultural chemical plumes are also traced miles from their source, if they are so good at binding to the soil. And, nobody said "quickly". Furthermore, it doesn't matter how fast they move. They do move.
Why?
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Once again many factors to consider... are these plumes traced back to a 10,000 sq foot neighborhood lot or a farm that may be treating many sq acres if not miles of land in a rather short period of time that may even have natural water sources traveling through the treatment area..are these plumes trace amounts that is from technology finding parts per trillion (can't think of any solutions that is considered harmful at a rate of PPT) or the noted plumes are amounts that has rendered the area they were found in, be it water or land, now a chemical waste land. Is the source of the plumes from proper usage of a product or was it mis applied, illegally dumped or part of an industrial accident..
Lar
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wrote:

Indirect answer: If someone is tracking chemical plumes in groundwater, there is a reason, and it's usually because someone has found a problem that is greater than parts per million. Strange smells, well water which fails standard safety test, that sort of thing.
What sort of work did you do, or DID you do before retirement?
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

LOL..."look honey..it looks like Lar is one of "them""
I have another 20 years before retirement age and if the work I do really matters, I have been posting on this group along with several related groups for years now, it should be easy enough to find me stating my work status many times over out there. But personally I wouldn't bother...does it really matter?
Lar
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Your comments about the chemical plume example suggested that you were thoroughly familiar with the general subject of underground contamination, so I was curious about whether your job was associated with that in some way.
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