Is my Christmas tree bad?

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Hi, I just picked up a Christmas tree from Home depot--a Balsam Fir to be exact. I was just wondering how to tell if the tree is fresh? We did notice a decent amount of needles that fell to the floor of the truck on the way home, but I'm not sure if this is normal or not? Can someone tell me what to look for, so that I'll know whether or not to return the tree? Thanks.
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Some needles will naturally fall out, at the first real good shake. After it is shaken real heavily to clear out the needles, it should not shed a lot a day later.
Bend a small branch or stem, out near the end of the branch. It should snap back pretty quickly instead of staying "with the bend."
Cut about an inch off the bottom of the stump (for a fresh cut) , and place the tree in water. It is amazing how much water they will suck up. Some folks put sugar in the water, but I never have felt the need for that. Watch the water level daily.
Hope this helps !!
--James--
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Check that dish many times each day and keep it full of fresh water.
When the concern of "fire hazard" starts to bother me, I take a few needles off the tree, place them in a metal container OUTSIDE, and light them. This gives me an idea of just how flammable my tree is.
(¯`·._.· £ãrrÿ ·._.·´¯)

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Keep it long past Christmas, and you'll see first-hand what "not fresh" looks like for next year. Plus, as an added bonus, you will get to see how long it takes.
Ask the guys at Home Depot for tips on keeping it fresh.
--
Farlo, the Urban Fey Dragon

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Hey thanks guys for your help. I guess it is fresh then--the branches do snap back pretty well and it doesn't seem to be dropping as amny needles as it did when it first got in the truck.

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The Christmas tree you'll soon be buying is at the end of its long journey. Having grown up in Oregon, it is harvested and placed on a flat bed truck for its cross country journey. Once every few stops, the trees are watered down to keep them moist and fresh. Just make sure that the beautiful Tannenbaum you invite into your living room doesn't make your allergies worse! Although an artificial tree is best (if you rinse off the attic dust!), here's some tips if you decide to go with a real tree: That continual watering promotes mold growth. Make sure to spray your tree with a garden hose before bringing it inside. This also helps rinse the pollen off the tree. Although pine trees aren't a major source of tree pollen, they can trigger hay fever if you get a big dose of the powder right in your face. Rinsing the tree off, plus using your allergy medicines before you enjoy trimming the tree, may prevent your Christmas-time allergy. Speaking of trimming the tree, your ornaments may have spent the off-season in the attic with dust mites and mold. Carefully clean them off in a well-ventilated area. After Christmas, pack the ornaments carefully in sealed plastic bags to make next year's job a bit easier. Keep the living room well-ventilated. The aromatic resins that impart the pine scent can act as non-allergic irritants. Our Texas Aggie buddies suggest the Leyland Cypress tree since, as a true hybrid, it cannot produce pollen. Fewer resins on the Leyland Cypress mean fewer odors. http://agnet.tamu.edu/stories/leyland.html Along with cheerful holiday gatherings come colds and flu. How does your doctor keep from getting all those bugs? We wash our hands with hot soapy water about 753 times a day. Careful hand washing can prevent transmission of respiratory viruses. Stay well and Happy Holidays from The Allergy Clinic, your allergy and asthma specialists!
Republished by Celestial Habitats J. Kolenovsky
TheKeith wrote:

--

Celestial Habitats by J. Kolenovsky
2003 Honorable Mention Award, Keep Houston Beautiful
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The Christmas tree you'll soon be buying is at the end of its long journey. Having grown up in Oregon, it is harvested and placed on a flat bed truck for its cross country journey. Once every few stops, the trees are watered down to keep them moist and fresh.
Just make sure that the beautiful Tannenbaum you invite into your living room doesn't make your allergies worse! Although an artificial tree is best (if you rinse off the attic dust!), here's some tips if you decide to go with a real tree:
That continual watering promotes mold growth. Make sure to spray your tree with a garden hose before bringing it inside. This also helps rinse the pollen off the tree. Although pine trees aren't a major source of tree pollen, they can trigger hay fever if you get a big dose of the powder right in your face. Rinsing the tree off, plus using your allergy medicines before you enjoy trimming the tree, may prevent your Christmas-time allergy. Speaking of trimming the tree, your ornaments may have spent the off-season in the attic with dust mites and mold. Carefully clean them off in a well-ventilated area. After Christmas, pack the ornaments carefully in sealed plastic bags to make next year's job a bit easier.
Keep the living room well-ventilated. The aromatic resins that impart the pine scent can act as non-allergic irritants. Our Texas Aggie buddies suggest the Leyland Cypress tree since, as a true hybrid, it cannot produce pollen. Fewer resins on the Leyland Cypress mean fewer odors. http://agnet.tamu.edu/stories/leyland.html
Along with cheerful holiday gatherings come colds and flu. How does your doctor keep from getting all those bugs? We wash our hands with hot soapy water about 753 times a day. Careful hand washing can prevent transmission of respiratory viruses.
Stay well and Happy Holidays from The Allergy Clinic, your allergy and asthma specialists!
Republished by Celestial Habitats J. Kolenovsky
maybe I should consider converting to judaism!
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it doesnt help. we got the tree along with everything else.... everyone been bitching about the tree not being aromatic and ours was sooo over the top with smell the first day I didnt know if I was going to be able to stand it.
forget the sugar water. it just breeds bacteria. sucrose is not glucose, which the tree needs anyway. fresh water is good. Ingrid

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ List Manager: Puregold Goldfish List http://puregold.aquaria.net / www.drsolo.com Solve the problem, dont waste energy finding who's to blame ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Unfortunately, I receive no money, gifts, discounts or other compensation for all the damn work I do, nor for any of the endorsements or recommendations I make.
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writes:

Hi j Nice article, but nitpicker that I am, I will make this comment: pines do indeed produce abundant pollen, and it is wind borne, covering lakes, creeks, the ground, your car, picnic tables, with a fine yeloow-green powder, but not at this time of year. Pollen is produced in the Spring/early Summer, so I doubt much would still be on the needles, certainly not going to "get a big dose of the powder in the face."
Emilie
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Millie, I don't know. I just happened to have read my Chamber of Commerce's newsletter the hour before and the allergy clinic that is also a member ran that article. I had mentioned the post was a republish. If you'd like the Doctor's name and e-mail, I would be glad to forward it on to you. He may be tickled his article was read by someone in California.
J
MLEBLANCA wrote:

--

Celestial Habitats by J. Kolenovsky
2003 Honorable Mention Award, Keep Houston Beautiful
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Even doctors get allergens wrong. My mother's allergist told her all about the evils of goldenrod......my mother explained to him the difference between wind pollinated and bee pollinated plants, and that during 'goldenrod' season, people are really reacting to ragweed!
However, it is definitely possible to be allergic to christmas trees, my brother was, horribly. We had fake trees for years because of it.
--
Ann, Gardening in zone 6a
Just south of Boston, MA
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Ann wrote:

This is so true. Since I study and research native plants in my area, I became aware of this about 4 years ago. I've gone to an allergy clinic (not the one in the article - I just met them when I joined the Chamber this year) and they always had goldenrod as a good guy. I have Solidago planted at my residential habitat.

I have reactions to scotch pine, though I love all the Christmas trees. Especially, the mulched ones as the product should be returned to earth where it grew from.

I've vacationed your way one year. Flew in to Logan and stayed in S. Yarmouth. Went to P-town, Martha's wine yard, Wood's Hole, Plymouth. Saw where John Belucci was buried (they actually have him interred in another spot away from the headstone so the animal house crew throw their beer cans in the wrong spot which is closer to the road for cleanup). Didn't see any Kennedy's, though. John was a good dude. I was 14 when it happened. Bobby, jr seems to be coming along with the Environmental organization he works for. Amazes me that time has passes to find out Clinton passed some good environmental laws. We need more acts like that.
J. Kolenovsky http://www.celestialhabitats.com zone 9a (in the current process of being reclassified)

--

Celestial Habitats by J. Kolenovsky
2003 Honorable Mention Award, Keep Houston Beautiful
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Plymouth is about 15 miles south of me. Hubby and I went out to P-Town last spring, it's about the only time I'll go out there (fall/winter, too) due to the horrendous traffic during high season. It's a shame, the cape is a beautiful place.

John was a good dude, and I was 7 when it happened, living in Michigan.

We do need a more environmentally conscious government. The dismantlement of the clean air act has got to stop, never mind what's happening to our food supply. Eh, that's another rant.......
--
Ann, Gardening in zone 6a
Just south of Boston, MA
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Ann wrote:
GMO's. Aren't they great? Soil loss and forest attrition. Chemical companies running amok and the turfgrass industry right behind them. Drilling in natural places.
Hey, check this out -
BURLINGTON SHAREHOLDERS WANT ANSWERS ABOUT RAINFOREST EXPLORATION PLANS
Shareholders for Houston-based Burlington National Resources voted on a resolution last week demanding the company clearly define its policy toward indigenous communities in the Amazon rain forest where the local company is exploring for oil.
Four tribes consisting of roughly 500,000 people inhabit the remote jungle areas in Ecuador and Peru known by the company as oil blocks 23 and 24. The presidents of the Shuar, Zapara, Shiwiar and Kichwa nations have demanded that Burlington cease operations on their land, citing environmental devastation, and human rights violations. Last March, presidents of the four tribes traveled to Houston to confront Burlington officials at their Galleria headquarters and call attention to the fact that the tribes opposed exploration. The company reported to media and shareholders that they had received consent from indigenous communities. While the resisters were blocked by security guards from communicating with company officials, this week¹s action by shareholders maybe enough to get executives¹ attention.
A shareholders representative said they hope adopting the resolution will be the first step toward ensuring Burlington officials receive the consent of indigenous communities and limit environmental impacts of exploring and drilling.
Mankind needs to quit screwing with the land loaned to us by our children.
J

--

Celestial Habitats by J. Kolenovsky
2003 Honorable Mention Award, Keep Houston Beautiful
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I've posted this link before, but it's worth checking out: http://www.biodemocracy.org . I subscribe to Organic Bytes, it's an eye-opener WRT our food and our government. Makes you think long and hard about what they're protecting...................
--
Ann, Gardening in zone 6a
Just south of Boston, MA
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May the Lorax bitch slap some sense into you.
You are the bad one.

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On Thu, 04 Dec 2003 11:42:40 GMT, "Cereoid-UR12-"

Why? Commercial Christmas trees aren't part of an old-growth forest; they're a crop. Might as well scold someone for buying roses or corn. What is your objection?
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tree was a balsam fir, a variety that is normally grown on Christmas tree farms, not a Truffula Tree BTW, the Once-ler we should be concerned about just signed the Healthy Forests Act (name makes you hurl) that gives the lumber industry the right to rape national forests under the pretense of protecting people from wild fires. The lumber industry got their political contributions back in spades. Just watch the group vote for him in droves, which could make him a Twice-ler.
John
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and after they chop the tree they will leave all the refuse, the branches etc behind as dead brush to fuel another fire. Ingrid

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ List Manager: Puregold Goldfish List http://puregold.aquaria.net / www.drsolo.com Solve the problem, dont waste energy finding who's to blame ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Unfortunately, I receive no money, gifts, discounts or other compensation for all the damn work I do, nor for any of the endorsements or recommendations I make.
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On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 14:56:56 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.xx.com wrote:

Are you sure? Since the trees are a crop for growers, one assumes they would have an interest in keeping their fields free from debris. And don't most Christmas tree lots also sell branches and trimmings for decoration?
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