Insect killing soap spray

I've read about using soapy water to spray on flowers to kill aphids and other bugs.
Does anyone have a formula on how much liquid soap to use in a gallon of water to make such a spray, or where I might find such a formula?
Thanks
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To those comments I would add that there may also be small birds in your locality that will eat aphids. Every Spring I get aphids on my roses and every year they are gone again within about 2 weeks as the Fairy wrens come in and work over the 100+roses in my garden. If you don't have any tiny birds in your garden try to encourage them to come with sympathetic plantings because they really do work very hard and I'd rather they did that than I had to do it.
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"Freckles" wrote:

I use Murphy Oil Soap as a pre-emergent, 1 Tbls to a gallon of water in my sprayer. Murphy's is a pure vegetable soap, not harmful to birds and other wildlife but it will kill soft bodied sap sucking insects and repel others. You really should spray before flowers/blossoms open or you will repel pollenators.
http://www.colgate.com/app/MurphyOilSoap/US/EN/Products/OriginalFormula.cwsp
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swish bar ivory until the water takes on a gray appearance
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In article
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Modern-Homesteading/2007-06-01/Country-Lor e-Homemade-Insecticidal-Soap-Spray.aspx
Country Lore: Nontoxic, Homemade Insecticidal Soap Spray By Ted Swensen This insect spray is economical and environmentally safe for indoors or in the garden. You can use it for soft bodied insects, such as aphids, and for little sugar ants. To make the insecticidal soap spray, shave one quarter of a bar of Fels-Naptha laundry soap (about 1 inch) into 1 quart of heated water and stir until dissolved. This will be your insecticidal soap concentrate. Put the soap solution into a labeled jar. To use the soap spray, put 1 teaspoon of concentrate per quart into a sprayer. This insecticidal soap is a contact poison, so spray it directly onto the insects you want to eliminate from your home, garden or orchard. For additional killing power, add one-quarter cup of rubbing alcohol per quart. Ted Swensen President, Home Orchard Society Portland, Oregon
http://www.care2.com/greenliving/homemade-insecticidal-soap.html # Soap has been used for centuries as an all-purpose pesticide. It disrupts insects cell membranes, and kills pests by dehydration. The key is not to use too much soap, or youll also kill the vegetation near the pests. If you follow the proportions of soap to water in the Soap Spray recipe, below, the vegetation should be fine. Note: Buy a liquid soap and not a detergent. Health food stores have liquid soaps, such as Dr. Bronners Pure-Castile Soaps. Insecticidal Soap Spray 1 to 2 tablespoons liquid soap 1 quart water Combine ingredients in a bucket, mix, then transfer to a spray bottle as needed. All-Purpose Pesticide Soap Spray Strong smelling roots and spices such as garlic, onions, horseradish, ginger, rhubarb leaves, cayenne and other hot peppers, are all known to repel insects. INGREDIENTS A handful of roots and spices Enough boiling water to cover Soap Spray (recipe, above) Add the roots and spices to the bottom of a mason jar. Cover with the boiling water, screw on the top, and let set overnight. Strain, and add to the Soap Spray. Note that this will rot, so use it all up or freeze leftovers for another time. Variation: Garlic Spray Use 1 to 2 heads garlic. Deer and rabbits hate the smell of garlic. More on Natural Pest Control (30 articles available) More from Annie B. Bond (3249 articles available) -------- http://www.organicgardening.com/feature/0,7518,s1-2-9-9,00.html
Control Insects Without Pesticides
Simple organic solutions for pest problems.
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We certainly understand that many gardeners become anxious when they see pests on their plants and want to react decisively when they see their plants damaged. But we must remind you of the central principle of organic gardening: growing plants in harmony with Nature. And insects, even those that eat your plants, are a crucial part of that system. When you see insects in your garden, take some time to really watch what they're doing. Are they actually destroying the plant or just nibbling it a bit? Many plants can outgrow minor damage. Also, in many cases, insects attack stressed out plants. Do you have enough healthy plants to spare the sickly ones? Can you restore sickly plants to robust health so they can resist insect attack? The best defenses against insect attack are preventative measures. Grow plants suited to the site and they'll be less stressed out. Don't let them be too wet, too dry or too shaded. Design a diverse garden, so that pests of a particular plant won't decimate an entire section of the garden.
Most importantly, encourage the natural predators of pest insects to hunt in your gardenbeneficial insects (such as the common ladybug), birds, frogs and lizards control pests by eating them. You can make your garden hospitable for your natural allies by keeping a water source (just a dish-full, if that's all you've got) nearby for them and by not wiping out the entire pest population with a pesticide, sending the beneficials elsewhere in search of food. Also, grow plants with small blossoms like sweet alyssum and dill, which attract predatory insects who feed on flowers' nectar between attacks on pests.
Barriers such as row covers, netting and plant collars very effectively protect crops from pests. Sticky traps and pheromone lures are another way to minimize your pest problems without harming other living things in your garden. You'll find row covers (the best-known brand is Reemay) and other barriers, along with traps and the like at your local garden center and in mail-order catalogs.
Finally, if you need to react quickly to an acute pest invasion you can choose from several natural products that affect specific insects, won't harm humans, pets or wildlife, and that degrade quickly in the environment. Among the best of those products is Bacillus thuringiensis, a naturally occurring bacteria that you apply to your plants to disrupt the digestion of caterpillars and other leaf-eaters. Be sure to identify the pest positively before you buy this product because each strain of Bt affects specific kinds of insects. Horticultural oils, insecticidal soaps and garlic and/or hot pepper sprays also work well against many pests. --------- http://www.ehow.com/how_4904754_tobacco-listerine-dish-washing-soap.html
How to Make Bug Spray Using Tobacco, Listerine, Dish Washing Soap By kristara, eHow Member
Rate: (5 Ratings) This is a toxic bugs spray, not to be used on any edible plants or fruit trees. It's cheap to make and works very well. I recommend it for roses and other flowering and non-flowering bushes and plants.
Instructions Difficulty: Easy
Things Youll Need: Package of Chewing Tobacco Listerine Lemon Dish Washing Detergent Spray Bottle Step 1
Empty contents of package of chewing tobacco into 1 gallon of hot water. The tobacco can be wrapped in cheese cloth for easy removal or strain off later. Let the tobacco soak in the water over night. The water will turn a dark brown color. Step 2 Remove tobacco from the water either by straining or removal of the tobacco wrapped in cheese cloth. Pour into a 2 quart spray bottle. The nicotine is highly toxic. Keep away from children and animals. Do not use on anything you will eat. Step 3
Add 1 oz. Listerine. The Listerine is naturally an insect repellent. Bugs do not like the scent and stay away from your plants. Step 4
Add 1 teaspoon of dish washing detergent. The dish washing detergent makes the mixture stick to your plants. Step 5 Mix well. Spray on to the plants, bushes or trees being careful not to inhale the mixture. This is toxic. Reapply after every rainfall or full watering.
---------- http://www.netpamj.com/home-remedies.htm Home remedies for insect and disease control The following information is provided by the University of Florida and the Brevard County Extension Service... Home-made soap and oil spray for insect control - you can use these remedies either alone or together. Mix 2 1/2 tbsp cooking oil and 2 1/2 tbsp baby shampoo in 1 gallon of water. Mix well. NOTE: Shake well before and during application. Water the plant the day before you spray. Spray every 5 to 7 days as needed. This may injure plants with hairy leaves or with very thin waxy coverings on the leaves like squash and other crucifers. Reduce potential injury by rinsing the plant with fresh water a few hours after the soap spray application. Do not spray during the heat of the day in full sun! Thorough coverage of the pest is necessary so spray both sides of the foliage until it drips from the leaves. However, to be safe, test the spray on a small area of the plant. Wait 2-3 days and then check for any damage. If a fungus is also present, than add to the above formula: 2 tbsp baking soda NOTE: shake well before and during application. If the weather is humid or the threat of disease is high, spray every 5 to 7 days. Spray both sides of the leaves thoroughly at the first sign of disease. Always test any spray on a small area of the plant. Can be used against black spot and mildew on roses, powdery mildew on summer squash, early blight on tomatoes and alternaria leaf blight on melons, and who knows what else! Do not use oil on orchids. The use of soap or oil for insect control will control the insects but will do nothing to correct the condition that is making the plant susceptible to the insects. Using foliar applications of fish emulsion and seaweed may help ill plants do better. Disease control for orchids Single plants with fungus problems can often be treated with ground cinnamon rather than a chemical fungicide. The orchid leaves must be damp enough for the cinnamon to stick to the leaves. Just sprinkle the cinnamon on the affected area. Allow the leaves to dry for approximately one week and the area will dry out. (Information provided by the American Orchid Society) Another control for the fungus Powdery Mildew -- Spray a milk solution (minimum of 10% concentration, which is 1 cup of milk in 9 cups of water) twice a week. (Research conducted in Brazil and published in the journal Crop Protection [vol. 18, 1999,pp.489-92.] The milk has shown to be as effective or better than conventional fungicides.) Use aspirin to fight fungus, too. Dissolve 3/4 of an aspirin in a gallon of water, and spray every 2 to 3 weeks. The aspirin will boost the plants defence mechanism. Testing done at the University of Rhode Island showed that tomato and other plants tested also yielded more fruit than those treated with commercial fertilizers. For a root rot fungus in the soil -- (Pythium, Rhizoctonia, Phytophthora and Fusarium). Add some corn meal (right off the grocery store shelf) to the diseased soil and plant(s). The corn meal will stimulate the good soil micro-organisms that keep the bad microbes under control. (This research was carried out by the Texas A&M research station in Stephenville where they are growing peanuts organically.) Corn earworm control -- Mix vegetable oil and some Btk (Bacillius thuringiensis var. kurstaki) together. Using an eye dropper, apply 5 drops of the mixture per ear just as the corn silks begin to turn brown. (This recommendation is backed by research conducted at the University of Massachusetts and Hampshire College.) Red pepper spray for repelling insects -- Mix 2 tbsp red pepper (example: McCormick Cayenne Pepper from spice section of grocery store) and 6 drops of baby shampoo in 1 gallon of water Let this mixture sit overnight and then stir it thoroughly to dissolve as much of the pepper as possible. (Before putting this solution in your sprayer it is best to strain it so that it doesn't clog the sprayer nozzle.) Spray this mixture weekly. (Research done at Auburn University in Alabama showed that this solution in addition to garlic juice sprays helped repel insect pests from cabbage plants. Research has also shown that garlic juice not only repels insects, but can even kill many insects.)
--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being
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Top posting on purpose - do you personally recommend anything, Billy?
I only ask as I think we're all capable of googling. For me, when I post to a newsgroup, I'm looking for personal experience.
For me, I've used cayenne tea, garlic tea, dishwashing liquid and I think I've tried tobacco tea all with moderate success.
When I mentioned original thought in a previous post, this was what I was referring to, not the particular quote you used.
Usenet to me is sharing personal knowledge. JMO (but it is my opinion.).
Kate
wrote:

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wrote:

Yeah, well, I tried this one last year and it didn't do squat on apids, cabbage loopers or mater hornworms.
Even at triple the rate of concentrate, it didn't work.
Stinks too.
My healthier-every-year-soil is making more difference than anything, I feel.
Charlie
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Which is why I included:
We certainly understand that many gardeners become anxious when they see pests on their plants and want to react decisively when they see their plants damaged. But we must remind you of the central principle of organic gardening: growing plants in harmony with Nature. And insects, even those that eat your plants, are a crucial part of that system. When you see insects in your garden, take some time to really watch what they're doing. Are they actually destroying the plant or just nibbling it a bit? Many plants can outgrow minor damage. Also, in many cases, insects attack stressed out plants. Do you have enough healthy plants to spare the sickly ones? Can you restore sickly plants to robust health so they can resist insect attack? The best defenses against insect attack are preventative measures. Grow plants suited to the site and they'll be less stressed out. Don't let them be too wet, too dry or too shaded. Design a diverse garden, so that pests of a particular plant won't decimate an entire section of the garden.
Most importantly, encourage the natural predators of pest insects to hunt in your garden--beneficial insects (such as the common ladybug), birds, frogs and lizards control pests by eating them. You can make your garden hospitable for your natural allies by keeping a water source (just a dish-full, if that's all you've got) nearby for them and by not wiping out the entire pest population with a pesticide, sending the beneficials elsewhere in search of food. Also, grow plants with small blossoms like sweet alyssum and dill, which attract predatory insects who feed on flowers' nectar between attacks on pests. ----- IMHO FarmI had the best answer to the question that should have been asked. Don't be shy about jumping in.
Hey, the poster ASKED for a recipe. "Does anyone have a formula on how much liquid soap to use in a gallon of water to make such a spray, or where I might find such a formula?" The formula came from "Mother Earth News". I was bored, as you and Kate seem to be bored. I gave her what she asked for, with a previso. The first defense against insects, is healthy plants.
Since when do we second guess a poster or withhold information that is benign and easy to give?
Why don't you go build a deer-proof fence, or remove a tree stump or somethin'? Oh, and I don't think I'm going to be making Kate happy anytime soon. Hopefully, she has a husband to improve.
I'd really love to hear an explanation from anyone, but Jangchub, on what surface tension" has to do with the turgidity of the stomata cells, that would cause them to open-up, causing a plant to dry-out, shrivel, and die. And what kind of soap is Ivory soap, other than it is made from fats and a base?
Oh, little mysteries of life.
So, how'd you get on with your Jersey Giants? I got half of my UC-157s in and the trench dug for the second half. After they're in, I need to prep a new bed for the leeks. I'm getting lettuce, celery, chives, parsley, and oregano from the garden. The second year for the medicinal herbs is looking good, even if the identifying tags did wash off the potts. The milk thistle is feral but keeps showing up in the same area. The mint is on the move but it is too early, and cool, to start pulling it for ice water. Radishes and carrots are showing. Peas are just sort of staring at me and not doing much. It's almost May and I haven't killed off half of the seedlings, so it looks like it's going to be a grand year. Still have the water rationing to get around though. I'll be happy when I get past the digging and on to gardening.
--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being
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wrote:

Why do I seem to be bored?

Second guess? Are you playing with your crayola or being grouchy?

What? I don't have a deer problem or stump problem.

What the hell are you going on about now? And am I mis-construing your post or are you grouching at me?

Uh....yeah, I agree.

We got all 75 in at son's, after bed prep and trenching and all that stuff......fair hard work for an overwintered lardass like myself.
Rained really hard a couple hours ago, so glad the job is done.

I'll be happy when I can get to sleep and stay asleep.
Charlie
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doing well enough with keeping it between the lines. Maybe I should have become a style editor and tell everyone how to get their responses right, instead of just answering questions. I read that the main thing is finding your voice.

Responses to these problems fell like manna from the skies, without a discouraging word from you or Kate.

you in next thursday for a quick course on wine tasting (last one standing is the loser;O).

Chub: "Do that on the wrong plant and break the surface tension opening the foliage and stomata to drying, shriveling, dying. Ivory is not the kind of soap wich works on the exoskeleton or softbodied insect. Use Ivory if you want, but I wouldn't use it on plants with a high ticket price."

me.
http://www.essortment.com/home/homemadeinsecti_sylg.htm The best type of soap for killing insects is debatable; some recommend pure castile soap or liquid hand soap (like Ivory), but others endorse various name brand liquid dish liquids (most often Dawn and Ivory).
Ivory:2 Chub:0
http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/pp/resourceguide/pdf/mfs12.pdf HOW IT WORKS: Insecticidal soap products work by smothering soft bodied pests and disrupting their cuticle layer. In order to be effective, it is necessary to thoroughly coat the pest. After the soap dries on the plant surface, insects and mites will not pick up a lethal dose. Soaps have little efficacy against insect eggs (Lawson and Weires 1991, Liu et al. 1996). Some insecticidal soaps are also labeled for powdery mildew suppression. It is not clear how soaps work to suppress plant diseases. Ammonium salts of fatty acids are used as a mammal repellant. They slowly release an ammonia smell that may deter deer and rabbits. Soaps also function as wetting agents or surfactants, reducing the surface tension of water. Using them can allow spray materials to penetrate into small crevices and cover plant surfaces better with less "beading up".

erroneously discredit his help. Don't know what it is with Chub and Shelly, they don't seem to understand humility. They are very good at somethings but then cross over the line, and claim expertise in areas where they become ludicrous. I guess what I'm sayin' is, that they need to find their voice, and not to take themselves so damn seriously (unless, of course, they are dealing with one of those insane, chemical-spewing planet-killers).

Junger.
and ring finger feel like I closed a door on them this morning.

Be careful of what you wish for ol' friend.
Now, where the hell are the rest of my crayolas?
--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being
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In article

Should be I'll be happy when I can get to sleep and stay asleep sound for 6 hours.

Yup!

<
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
CAdCdU-Ng>
Bill and 88 F right now.
More on topic :))
<
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_exY9ptMbA

--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

Not all who wander are lost.
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I'm still dizzy from 94F three days ago but the plants seem to like it. I got the clear plastic covers over most of my seedlings outside now (up about an inch at one end to keep from frying everything. 60F here in the redwoods.
--

- Billy
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