ID this plant?

http://tinypic.com/r/214wmjm/5
Tx!
HB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/14/11 2:44 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

Both the flower and leaves appear to be from a "Dutch" tulip. Don't bother planting it in the ground. Where you live (coastal southern California), tulips are treated as annuals. They are perennial only where there is snow in the winter. Even where I live (inland southern California), we don't get enough winter chill for the classic Dutch tulip.
If you really want tulips in your garden, try lady tulips (Tulipa clausiana). It does not require winter chill.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks, David. I haven't the faintest idea where this came from. I've never had tulips. In fact I have near zero experience with bulbs. (It is a bulb?) So just let this bloom? And then? Wikipedia's article seems to (sort of) suggest that if the plant undergoes "vernalization" it might bloom again.
HB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Higgs Boson;944300 Wrote: > On Dec 14, 4:01*pm, "David E. Ross" snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.invalid wrote:-

> (http://tinypic.com/r/214wmjm/5)-

> tulip..

Hi, Well, it is definitly a tulip, but I think it is one of the 'new hybrids' between the many species tulips.
Yours isn't a 'dutch' tulip, these grow a foot or more high with one flower per stem. Contrary to popular mythe they do not need frost to grow and/or flower. It is true, commercial cut flower producers chill the bulbs down to 38f for a few weeks prior to planting in green houses at 70 degrees to 'force' them into flower.
Back to your plant, Plant it in an alpine bed, if you have a spot shaded from the strongest of the sun then it should be fine.
Remove the individual flowers as soon as they have 'gone over' don't wait for all the petals to drop. It may flower again next year, you should end up with a small clump of bulbs, leave them for three years, then lift and split them after flowering, as the leaves begin to die off. Then replant them.
I think I have seen the one in the picture being sold as 'Fangio' or 'Fandango', but there are so many of them, but it is certainly one of the species types being multi flowered on a single stem, equally it is a hybrid.
Many of these will thrive in an alpine setting, even in your climate. All the best Paul Rix [oldgeezer]
--
Paul Rix


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 16 Dec 2011 13:22:35 +0000, Paul Rix

There's really nothing particularly "Dutch" about tulips, only that there happen to be many tulip nurserys in the Netherlands. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tulip
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Brooklyn1;944436 Wrote: > On Fri, 16 Dec 2011 13:22:35 +0000, Paul Rix

> (http://tinypic.com/r/214wmjm/5)-)

> a

> (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tulip)
Hi Brooklyn, absolutely right! there's more daffodils and tulips within 30 miles of here than all of Holland! most of the dutch who grow them for cut flowers get their bulbs from here!
To clarify things, in this instance however 'dutch' referred to a type usually grown for cut flowers as well as garden display.
All the best Paul Rix [oldgeezer]
--
Paul Rix


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.