Hyssop invasive?

I see this a member of the mint family....if I even hear the word mint.....I think of an invasive plant.
Is it?
A: as bad as mint? B: not nearly? C: not at all?
THANKS
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mint.....I
Mine hasn't been invasive. It tends to form slowly growing clumps rather than aggressive root runners like spearmint. The only issue is that it produces lots of seeds and they tend to germinate at a rather high rate. That said, the seedlings are very easy to kill by simply cultivating the soil when you see them sprout. I started some from seed about 5 years ago and they did really well. Unfortunately, they seem to have died off this winter. I only have a few left, so I am letting the seedling mature and will thin them later. I always leave the seed heads alone for winter interest and wildlife food. If you removed the flowers before they set seed, you would eliminate the issue.
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My agastache foeniculum disappears every winter and reappears as a few chance seedlings only in the immediate vicinity. It grows quickly in the heat of the summer and flowers from about mid-July on here - (zone 5/6, inland Northwest). I would not describe it as invasive - and self-sows much less abundantly than, say, cosmos, california poppies. or alyssum.

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much
Interesting. I'm in zone 6 and mine formed very tough clumps that persisted for at least 5 years. The bed around them was (and is this year) covered with thousands of seedlings - not just a few.
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I have several hyssops including Agastache rugosa, Hysoppus officinalis 'Nana', Agastache foeniculum x rugosa 'Blue Fortune', & Agastache foeniculum 'Golden Jubilee' which have perennialized wonderfully, are long-flowering throughout summer, form healthy good-looking clumps, but are not the least bit invasive, if anything kind of slow-growing.
Some other & rather sage-like hybrid hyssops like 'Apricot Surprise' 'Pink Panther' tend to be defacto annuals on Puget Sound but in places without such wet seasons they'd seed all over the place, but I don't think invasively.
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wrote:

Would you say that they are short-lived perennials? Mine did great for several years, but didn't come back this spring. I had Agastache foeniculum 'Licorice Blue'
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No, I'd say A. foeniculum & A. rugosa are notably long-lived, but they are always at some risk if they experience an unusually wet season, especially in winter.
-paggers
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