HELP!! tomatos, NOT

I planted two tomato plants I got from Walmart recently. They both had blossoms but no fruit!, It's been some tinme now, and the plants are big and leafy, but no more blossoms, and no fruit. I live in the Csalifornia High Desert, and it's warm up here, the plants are beautiful, but no blossoms. I tried rto get blossom set, but they don't sell it anymore. Now I have beautiful green plants but no tomatos!
Any Help please Doc ========================
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= Poor fruit set is related to high temperatures and low humidity, daytime temps above 90 and night temps that don't get below 70. 59-68F at night sets the most fruit. Generally wonderful foliage and no blossoms is caused by excess nitrogen ( miracle gro mania) If you went crazy with soluble nitrogen fertilizer try pinching the plants back, giving them a good soaking, and adding a little bit of sugar as a carbon source to the soil to tie up some of the soluble nitrogen as bacteria.
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I can understand the first part of your statement. But adding sugar is new to me for carbon as I think of wood ashes for the carbon. Perhaps a new trick for me. Sounds expensive some how. Still I think you mean as remedial for imbalance on a small scale perhaps. . Adding sugar got me way off present practice thinking..
Bill who spills Hummer sugar only 1-4 parts water.
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Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

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I think you're preoccupied with your patient ;o)) We've been throug this before. Anyway, take a look at www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/pdf1993/misra93a.pdf

Think "Teaming with Microbes", Chapter 1, where they write about plant exudates. . . . Root exudates are in the form of carbohydrates (including sugars) and proteins. Amazingly, their presence wakes up, attracts, and grows specific beneficial bacteria and fungi living in the soil that subsist on these exudates and the_ cellular material sloughed off as the plant's root tips grow. All this secretion of_ exudates and sloughing-off of cells takes place in the rhizosphere, a zone immediately around the roots, extending out about a tenth of an inch, or a couple of millimeters (1 millimeter = 1/25 inch). The rhizosphere, which can look_ like a jelly or jam under the electron microscope, contains a constantly changing mix of soil organisms, including bacteria, fungi, nematodes, protozoa, and_ even larger organisms. All this life" competes for the exudates in the rhizosphere, or its water or mineral content.
At the bottom of the soil food web are bacteria and fungi, which are attracted to and consume plant root exudates. In turn, they attract and are eaten by bigger microbes, specifically nematodes and protozoa (remember the amoebae, paramecia, flagellates, and ciliates you should have studied in biology?), who eat bacteria and fungi (primarily for carbon) to fuel their metabolic functions. Anything they don't need is excreted as wastes, which plant roots are readily able to absorb as nutrients. How convenient that this production of plant nutrients takes place right in the rhizosphere, the site of root-nutrient absorption.
<snip>
Soil bacteria and fungi are like small bags of fertilizer, retaining in their bodies nitrogen and other nutrients they gain from root exudates and other organic matter (such as those sloughed-off root-tip cells). Carrying on the analogy, soil protozoa and nematodes act as fertilizer spreaders" by releasing, the nutrients locked up in the bacteria and fungi fertilizer bags." The nematodes and protozoa in the soil come along and eat the bacteria and fungi in the, rhizosphere. They digest what they need to survive and excrete excess carbon and other nutrients as waste. -------
Is sugar water good for hummeres?
My latest book is "The fatal harvest reader : the tragedy of industrial agriculture", edited by Andrew Kimbrell. Only just started and already the book is into the fact that from 1982 to 2002 food production increased faster than the population but that hunger increased by 11% in the world. Fifty percent of antibiotics used in the US are used for live stock and drug resistant bacteria are the 11th leading cause for death in the US. Farmers who use standard agrichemicals have a seven fold incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphomas in comparison to people who don't use them.
Time for the "happy hour".
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Billy
Bush and Pelosi Behind Bars
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I need to correct a couple of misstatements.

Make that 1970 to 1990 ("industrial agriculture's" prime years), world hunger increased by at least 11% everywhere except China.

were six times more likely to get non-Hodgkin lymphomas than non-farmers.

And a successful one it was ;o))
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Billy
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I'll check it out.
Found this.
<http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/load/organic/msg0121101210881.html
"A SWEET END TO WEEDS by Margrit Beemster Sugar has the potential to control annual weeds according to recent research trials conducted by researchers from Charles Sturt University." From above url even speaks of sugar to help remove Dog Urine stains.

Yup just plain old sucrose 1 part to 4 parts water. No dye required and it is not good for hummers. Have one feeder here and you have one hummer. Have two feeders in sight of each other and I'll have one hummer. Have three feeders not in sight of each other and we have many.

Even rotenone is not good.
<http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18579341?ordinalpos=2&itool=EntrezSys tem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum>
Bill
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Bill, take a look at http://www.sciencelab.com/page/S/PVAR/SLF1372
I believe it may be the promised land ;O)
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You are under my protection !
Many Thanks!
Bill
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I hope you have an electronic scale. I would think you would want divvy up. That is at least two life time supplies, maybe four from where we are standing;o)
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I don't think there will be much carbon in wood ash after all that's pretty much what was burned away to make the ashes. All the sugar does is let the microbes in the soil go into a riot of growth making excess soluble nitrogen less soluble. If you haven't gone nuts with fertilizers it shouldn't much matter. As for the expense? the original poster has 2 tomato plants not 200 acres!
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