have groundhogs?

Hi-
strange posting you may think, but I'm looking to adopt an orphaned groundhog. I'd like a pet groundhog and am looking to pay someone for their "garden-unfriendly" baby groundhog.
I know that a lot of people might not think this is a great idea, but I've done a good amount of research on it and am willing to give it a go.
I don't want to go and just take one from the wild, but I've been told that come October and November a lot of groundhogs become orphaned when their mothers get hit by cars, shot or otherwise disappear.
I live in New York and would be willing to drive (a reasonable distance) to come pick up the goundhog. However, because I'm raising the animal in captivity, I need to start with a baby groundhog rather than taking a full grown adult out of his element.
If you've got some groundhogs that you might not want and you'd be willing to trap him HUMANELY, I will be willing to pay for the little guy.
Thanks, marianne snipped-for-privacy@netzero.com
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On Sat, 04 Oct 2003 22:33:37 -0400, glowworm wrote:

I think it's the wrong time of year to find a baby. Late winter/Early spring is your best bet. That's when the couple down in my backyard have their babies. Hudson Valley by the way.
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Do you really have a pet groundhog or are you pulling my leg?

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Do you really have a pet groundhog or are you pulling my leg?

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On 5 Oct 2003 09:11:45 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@netzero.com (glowworm) wrote:
<Do you really have a pet groundhog or are you pulling my leg?
LOL!!
I don't think I've ever trapped one this late in the year. I let em live and let live until they start reaking havoc in the garden, then they gotta go... in CT, that's usually June or July, IIRC.
I think your best bet would be to identify your general area, and then have someone email you when they get tired of sharing their yard with one of those little buggers. I know if I had one that had to go, I would have been happy to let it go in your yard, privided it was in the vicinity. I used to drive em up to one of the local reservoirs, about a 25 mile loop.... been a couple years though.
< < <
<> <> <> > If you've got some groundhogs that you might not want and you'd be <> > willing to trap him HUMANELY, I will be willing to pay for the little <> > guy. <> <> <> Listen, if you're going to do this with an eye towards raising a little <> weatherman come Feb. 2, don't even bother. Been there done that. Mine <> just sits on the couch eating chips and watching tv. <> <> - S
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snipped-for-privacy@netzero.com (glowworm) wrote in

I'm pulling your leg. :-)
The only thing I know about pets is if you stop feeding them, they start to smell funny.
But did you check out the local wildlife rehab center to see if they had any loaners before you jump in with both feet?
- S
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snipped-for-privacy@netzero.com (glowworm) wrote:

It's supposed to be easier to live with a highly social prairie dog than with a comparatively antisocial groundhog, but way back when I had a housemate with a pet prairie dog, cute as the devil was, the key word there is "Devil" rather than cute. Destructive, smelly, hated being caged so very noisy if not let out, & when fully mature, dangerous to strangers. Groundhogs can make interesting pets but it takes a special sort of weirdo to not mind having ones stuff destroyed & getting bitten now & then. If not neutered or spade, they WILL manifest many difficult to forgive wild animal traits at maturity, & sometimes get unamanageable even if they are "fixed."
Still, many people live with semi-tame groundhogs in their gardens tell wonderful positive tales of happy interactions (less happy tales from people who try to keep them indoors). If one's gardens are large enough, they're not TOO destructive of garden plants overall, especially if used to getting their main food from people. There is quite a lot about pet groundhogs throughout this website: http://www.hoghaven.com
I'd recommend you connect first with wildlife rehabilitators to see if they need volunteer help. Raising an orphan for release will give you some expertise that will first of all probably change your mind about keeping one permanently. But if it doesn't change your mind, rehabilitating will also put you in the way of perhaps being able to keep one, as occasinally an orphan is injured & permanently crippled so cannot be released to the wild. If not so injured, keeping them is otherwise discouraged by rehabilitators, and in many places would be illegal.
-paghat the ratgirl
--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
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snipped-for-privacy@netscapeSPAM-ME-NOT.net (paghat) wrote in message

thanks for all of your help!
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