Frugal silk plants? Or real house plants?

Page 1 of 2  
Im a bachelor......
Ive been toying with the idea of buying a few silk/fake plants for decorating inside of home a bit.
Damn those plants seem expensive to me tho!!
Im wanting fairly good size fake palms.... or fake "trees"....and prices seem to run abt $150 or so
It seems to me I can buy REAL palms and plants much cheaper than the fake ones.
Does anyone have ideas on how to get frugal fake plants?
Or should I forget the fake ones and just get some REAL ones??
If replying via email please use:
morris63401 at yahoo dot com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 22 Sep 2003 10:37:28 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Why were you thinking of fake plants?
Be honest with yourself -- and us.
--
Persephone



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cause Im afraid I would kill real plants.... and that they would require more care.... i.e.creating "one more thing to do everyday".
But like I said fake plants seem VERY high -
If replying via email please use:
morris63401 at yahoo dot com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a fake cat. This pussy is very house trained.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Real plants aren't hard to keep (if you pick common types that are easy to keep) and they have many advantages. Firstly, they cannot look fake in any way, and they make the house air fresher and smell nicer. They also cost less than fakes and you can save even more cash by buying small ones and growing them.
I have about 17 large plants in my house (between 4 to 7 foot tall), all are real and need minimal effort to keep. I try to buy tougher plants like kentia palms or rubber plants, which are very hard to kill. I only need to water every month as I found these devices that are full of water and are burried in the soil to provide a steady supply of water. They're barely noticable in the pot, and if you put them at the back they can't be seen at all. As for feeding, you can buy those tablets that last anywhere from 4 months to a year, depending on the plant size and tablet brand. Since my plants are so big I use the kind designed for trees which last a year. Watering 12 times a year is nothing compaired to the task of cleaning a fake plant that's covered in dust, so I actually think my real ones are *less* work than fake. They also can't oveflow and make a mess with the self watering devices. -- Bry ------------------------------------------------------------------------ posted via www.GardenBanter.co.uk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What exact plants do you have?

Do you have a link for these devices?
What are they called and where can you buy them?
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

I have quite a few plants now, so I'll quickly list some and how easy I've found them to grow.
A 4 foot Chinese fan palm in the conservatory: It's not a fast grower, so be prepaired to wait or buy a bigger plant, but it is very elegant and likes bright direct light. So far, it's proven to be very tough.
A 7 foot Kentia palm in the hallway: This does grow fast, so buy a smaller one for less and grow it to save some cash. It seems to like indirect light from several angles, so double aspect rooms are perfect. It will grow towards the light sources, but unlike most plants it looks equally good from behind, so you don't need to rotate it.
A 5 foot yucca in the bathroom: It's tough, grows fairly fast and seems to like the humidity, I'd highly recomend it for a bathroom that can spare the space for one.
Several larger peace lillys: All of mine are in suprisingly dark corners that get indirect light at best, places little else could grow. I find they take an attractive shape in corners and even grow quite fast. Ignoring them (aside from a little watering) is the best way to make them thrive...
Potted ivy on top of several fireplaces: I like to pot a long thin tub with small leaved varigated ivy and put it in the middle of a mantle where it cascades down. Ivy is verging on immortal from my experience, little can kill it, not even drought or dousing with roundup entirely stops it! The only thing I do is clip the ivy to the desired length once in a while, and feed if I'm feeling generous and have time to spare.
A 6 foot rubber plant: This grows at an excellent rate given plenty of sunlight, I highly recomend it for people who don't like to fuss over plants.
Anyway, that's a good starting list of very different plant types which seem to grow with minimal care. And the link you asked for is:
http://www.plantpal.co.uk /
It does say two weeks between watering, but I only water once a month and the plants seem to survive nicely. Although some larger plants do have two in each pot and many smaller plants are in bigger pots to accomodate the watering device. I've also mulched the tops of the pots to concerve water, and I use plastic pots inside the decorative ones as ceramics allow water to evaporate faster. -- Bry ------------------------------------------------------------------------ posted via www.GardenBanter.co.uk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Shop around, make sure you check Walmart too. I recently bought a silk spider plant for my no-natural-light office. I paid $3 for it, and then while looking for a container saw the same or smaller plant elsewhere for $7 and $15.
Janine
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I don't have any fake plants. Buy plants what require very little care. Palms, sanseveria, philodendron, cast iron can all take an occasional drought. Younger plants will climatize to your space better than full grown.
On Mon, 22 Sep 2003 10:37:28 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 22 Sep 2003 12:27:19 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

You'll get plenty of advice on this NG, but you might also want to visit a good neighborhood nursery. They'd be best equipped to advise on what works in your area. Be sure to tell them where you plan to put the plants in your dwelling -- how far from window; amount and intensity of light; the kind of indoor heating you use, etc.
Rest assured you are not the only apt. dweller who has indoor plants! They do dress up a place, don't they! Massing plants in an area is especially attractive, rather than just putting one here and one there.
And you may find you grow fond of your new "children", and enjoy making them happy!
--
Persephone



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm thinking silk also. I've had a nice ficus benjamina in the corner of my window room for years and it has done well, but this year it was too heavy and unwieldy to take outside for the summer. It is getting bigger and I am getting older. I saw a nice silk tree at Hobby Lobby for $79.
Marilyn in Ohio
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well I think they do...even tho I have none right now. lol

that's a good idea I hadn't thought of.... massing all the plants in one spot
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
1. paint your walls something besides white... dont leave the ceiling white. If you cant paint, look for wall hangings even material glued to a rod can work wonders 2. corner etageres can hold collections of interesting things 3. make a corner vignette use a cushy stuffed chair and table, with a torchiere behind it. put a couch at an angle to the corner and put the torchiere behind that and a table holding a smaller real or fake plant. 4. get a real or fake large plant and use a can up light to put shadows on the wall and ceiling, it doubles and triples the size. 5. combine real with fake plants so there isnt so much to take care of. Cyperus is like papyrus. It does really well in one of those big oriental looking ceramic containers with some light. even a nice hanging light with a round fluorescent lights. just fill it with water every week or so and will do great. this is a great time of year to find them at water gardening places... they are on sale in the north cause they wont over winter outside. Ingrid
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote: . I have some corners and space that i

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ List Manager: Puregold Goldfish List http://puregold.aquaria.net / www.drsolo.com Solve the problem, dont waste energy finding who's to blame ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Unfortunately, I receive no money, gifts, discounts or other compensation for all the damn work I do, nor for any of the endorsements or recommendations I make.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 23 Sep 2003 14:02:55 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.xx.com wrote:

Just curious why you are advising against white walls -- actually off-white is more aesthetic. In a dark apt. white reflects light, which would be helpful to the plants. A white ceiling gives the illusion of greater height; another aesthetic consideration.
...snippage...
--
Persephone

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah I am curious abt that as well
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
isnt enough light to do much for plants if they arent near the window anyway. white walls are sterile, they are the house equivalent of landscaping consisting of just grass, it is a blank canvas. everyone thought my painting the walls dark would close it in, and it didnt. that is a myth. here is an example of my walls.. used computer to put em back white. all the wood really jumps out with dark walls.. people asked me if I put in the crown molding and wainscotting.. I didnt, but they didnt see it with the pale wallpaper in there. here are pictures http://users.megapathdsl.net/~solo/MOH/lr/livingrm2.html Ingrid
snipped-for-privacy@Underworld.com wrote:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ List Manager: Puregold Goldfish List http://puregold.aquaria.net / www.drsolo.com Solve the problem, dont waste energy finding who's to blame ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Unfortunately, I receive no money, gifts, discounts or other compensation for all the damn work I do, nor for any of the endorsements or recommendations I make.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It's time to get real. For a pittance you can purchase MURALS which have plants, palms and even a beautiful sunset with buxom beauties. This gets all the clutter off the floor. Why not check out: http://www.cosmicairbrush.com/murals/index.shtml http://www.imaginehome.com / http://www.offthewallmurals.com/residential.htm etc.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

EXCELLENT idea!!
Thanks!
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
right, all commissioned. where can I get large posters "off the rack" with neat scenes, even photographs would be good. Ingrid

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ List Manager: Puregold Goldfish List http://puregold.aquaria.net / www.drsolo.com Solve the problem, dont waste energy finding who's to blame ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Unfortunately, I receive no money, gifts, discounts or other compensation for all the damn work I do, nor for any of the endorsements or recommendations I make.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in message

I have over thirty houseplants (like to have good air quality during the long winters here). Here is my experience
low light tolerance: sansevieria, peace lily, dark dracaenas, and pothos. Schefflera has some tolerance, and I also have another plant whose name escapes me that tolerates low loght rather well drought tolerance: sansevieria, light dracaenas, some palms, rubber plant, aloe, and schefflera
You can keep healthy plants indefinitely if you put them outside in the summer, in partial sun or bright shade. some burn in full sun, but sansevieria, schefflera, palms or rubber plant take full sun. Once you have a few, it will be easy to propagate and divide them, and get more of the same.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.