Fava bean pods not developing -- any idea why?

A row of favas I planted earlier this spring has developed the lovely flowers I enjoy, but when those flowers drop off, there's no emergent bean pod ... something I've not seen before. These seeds were planted in a newish bed that was filled primarily with a decent-quality commercial compost mixture ... the original clay soil having been carted away by our landscaper. Other crops did okay in that bad in year one, especially carrots and lettuces. But something there is that the favas don't seem to like.
jk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
buckyboy wrote:

Do Fava's need to be pollinated? Were there any pollinators around?
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nothing to do with the soil. It just tells you the bean flowers weren't fertilised. Maybe bees weren't flying, or it was too cold.
Janet
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
McGregors pollination handbook doesn't show all that great a yield reduction on plots that bees were excluded from. My bet is poor pollination from some other cause like rain or temperature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@localnet.com writes: |> McGregors pollination handbook doesn't show all that great a yield |> reduction on plots that bees were excluded from. My bet is poor |> pollination from some other cause like rain or temperature.
It depends on the variety whether that is even plausible. They are reliable in typical UK spring weather ....
More likely heat or drought, both of which can cause the varieties grown here (i.e. as broad beans) to fail to set. Cold and wet do cause setting failure here, but that does mean temperatures with highs around 40 and/or rain that doesn't let up for more than an hour or so at a time. They are partially self-fertile, but are mainly pollinated by bumblebees here, which may be why miserable conditions cause poor setting.
I can't speak for the "el ful" varieties.
Regards, Nick Maclaren.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks all for your counsel ... we've had a protracted cool and wet spring here in the SF Bay Area, with no more than a day or two of sunshine here and there. I'd forgotten that the birds 'n' bees play a role in all this...something to keep in mind in years to come.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.