fairy rings

It appears from trying to apply what little brain power I have to some of the info available on the web, that there is little one can do(without extreme measure) to 'kill' a fairy ring. I have one that encircles part of my lawn conatining roots from a Silverleaf Maple removed 2 years ago (likely the food source for the fungus) and a 1.5 year old installation of a 30 gallon container sized lacebark Elm. The Elm is doing quite well but lawn grass in the area is practically exterminated. Any suggestions?
thanx
Carl
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Carl- I have had a few fairy rings in my yard, and have grown to live with, and love it (them). Interestingly, a fairy ring of a couple of years, seems to have migrated to another spot, a few feet away.
I have a little gnome statutes. The one I have, is sleeping on his back. I like placing him in the center of the ring! He looks like he belongs there;-)
Myrl http://www.myrljeffcoat.com
Carl 1 Lucky Texan wrote:

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Carl, I don't know if all fairy rings are equal, or if they are the same in all regions, but here's some hope from the Pacific Northwest. We seem to have world class fairy rings, but they grow larger in diameter each season. Ours grow out into neighbors yards within five or six years. (of course theirs are crossing your territory at the same time) I've read, but not studied, that fairy rings of a sort are among the world's largest living organisms. Some have been recognized that are miles across. Aren't they pretty? (heehee) Old Chief Lynn
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according to info given to me the fungus responsible for fairy rings is deep within the soil and the only 'complete' (I cannot guarantee how complete) cure is to remove the turf to a depth of about 20cm. Make of that what you will.
rob
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George.com wrote:

Yeah, soil replacement or some type of crazy fumigant released to proffesionals only appears to be the closest thing to a 'cure'. Aeration does seem to help water penetrate better. I was hoping soeone mught have an effective 'home' cure that wasnr; permanently harmful to the soil.
sigh
Carl
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I had not only fairy rings, but in 2000, for no reason I can see, mushrooms upon mushrooms growing in the yard, all different kinds.
I harvested gallon jug after gallon jug of them, keeping the yard puppy-safe for a puppy-who-eats-everything.
Neither before nor afterwards has that happened. The yard has been undisturbed since 1973. Maybe it's a 27 year mushroom genre.
It was a cornfield before that.
The fairy rings sort of expand and die out. They produce interesting episodes when you cut your lawn, as a hobby, with a scythe, as the taller greener grass they create fall over in a very satisfying way when you get to one of them.
I suppose you could suppress the rings by adding lots of nitrogen to the lawn, so it's green all over.
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Ron Hardin wrote:

Yes, mine produce mushrooms in an arc at the perimeter of the ring. With suppressed growth in the middle area. And you're right, I have also read about boosting the nitrogen in the center along with aeration.
Carl
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Why do you want to kill the fungus?
Fairy Ring mushroom (Marasmius oreades) is quite edible, and is common in grass and lawns. If you have it, sample it. If you have no bad reactions, eat more. I do!
Much depends on what you call a "fairy ring". A circular growth pattern centered around a maple is probably closer to Armillariella mellea or similar fungus. This fungus can be symbiotic at times with its host tree (beneficial), and can also turn saprophytic and kill the tree. Your description of a dead Acer suggests the fungus is merely eating and decomposing the roots and woody debris still present underground. Nothing wrong with that. Nature does it all the time. It's called recycling.
Armillariella mellea is also edible for many people.
The best thing to do is figure out what the fungus is before you try to kill it. It might be good for the soil, and get rid of that woody debris before you have to dig it up.
Daniel B. Wheeler www.oregonwhitetruffles.com
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snipped-for-privacy@ipns.com wrote:

thanx for the fun info! maybe I'll look up the 'inflorescence' of those fungi and try to ID what I have. And yes, it seems quite likely the roots of the now gone maple are the food source. You post will also help me convince my wife that there may be no practical remediation.
Carl
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Carl 1 Lucky Texan wrote:

looks more like Chlorophyllum or maybe Agaricus. They have thicker stems and are whiter than Marasmius. pretty sure they're not A. mellea but ???
sigh
Carl
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If Chlorophyllum molybdites (and in Texas it could be), just add them to the compost pile. Be sure to wash your hands afterwards, or at least wear gloves when picking them. C.m. is poisonous to many people.
If Agaricus (or a volva-less Amanita) the same caveats apply. An Amanita is far more problematic than an Agaricus. In Oregon Amanitas can be anything from 2 inches tall to 24 inches across; in Texas they would probably be smaller. (Contrary to many Texan's belief, not _everything_ is bigger in Texas. Except tales, maybe.<G>)
Check out Google images for photos of above possibilities.
But you are right that the mushrooms would not be Marasmius oreades (fairy-ring mushroom) if they have white stems or caps. A. mellea is better known as "Honey Mushroom", and typically has a golden-brown cap and stem. Also, A. mellea is almost always found in clusters/clumps. Single mushrooms are possible on ground, but are less common in my experience.
Daniel B. Wheeler www.oregonwhitetruffles.com
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As an aside, does anyone know a good website for IDing mushrooms, so one can tell the difference between edible and poisonous specimines? I know folks go out and collect them in the wild, but I've always had a fear of that!
Myrl Jeffcoat http://www.myrljeffcoat.com
Carl 1 Lucky Texan wrote:

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