Deciduous fruit and Freezing Temps

I have deciduous fruit trees that are dormant (Peach, apple, apricot). (As they should be this time of year.) A couple have buds that haven't opened (big surprise). We are supposed to get temps down into the mid- to upper 20's this weekend with very little possibility of snow.
Question is this: Do the trees need to be protected from such cold temperatures?
-Bryan
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If this was March or April I'd say yes, but since it is still very much in the winter months I'd say no. Apricots are a little cold tender than peaches and apples, but all of these trees require a certain length of chill hours to set fruit, anyway. Last year my peach had a million flowers in spring, but didn't produce one peach because it never got cold enough for the fruit to set.
On Wed, 10 Jan 2007 21:01:23 GMT, BB

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It would not hurt to put some mulch around the base of the tree, but not touching the trunks. The problem with these cold temperatures is the alternate freezing and thawing of the ground and it's affect on the roots, especially when the temperatures keep hovering around the freezing point. The mulch should help to even up the temperature fluctuations, to some degree. You have to be careful to plant varieties of apples and stone fruits that are hearty for your climate zone. Most of these trees need a certain amount of chill hours and if the proper variety, can withstand periods of cold temperatures. They should be dormant, but as stated earlier, you don't want them to come out of dormancy only to be hit by freezing temperatures. Also, the
Winter sun can be quite strong, so tree guards can help keep the trunks from burning up, as well as keep the hungry critters at bay.
Sherwin D.
BB wrote:

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Where I am these trees do fine (-20oF for lows). In fact, apricots originate in somewhere like Mongolia. it is spring if there is a sudden late frost that knocks the petals off that is the problem. Now there are low chill varieties and varieties for southern climates that may be more sensitive. that I dunno Ingrid

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Thanks, Ingrid. That was pretty much what I was hoping for; practical experience with these sorts of things.
So far this weekend, all trees look like they're doing fine. I'm also reassured by the lack of news stories on how damaged these sorts of trees aren't because of the cold. Citrus; now that's another matter entirely. Growers are falling all over themselves to protect their fruit.
--Bryan
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