Daylilllies

Hi, Does anyone know what to do and what to use to revive growth in daylillies. I have beautiful plants that grow but do not bloom. What can I do to see them again and have them bloom and rebloom
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Maria wrote:

They probably need to be divided and replanted. Once the clump gets too big they stop blooming.
gloria p
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On 3/25/10 6:18 PM, gloria.p wrote:

I have some large, undivided clumps of daylilies that still bloom well. A few are just now starting to bloom.
Sunset's "Western Garden Book" indicates that they should be divided once in 3-6 years. Mine are at the 6-year mark. I might divide them this fall.
Flowering plants need phosphorus in the soil. Since this nutrient does not dissolve well or leach through the soil, it must be placed where roots will find it. Take a length of 1/4-inch steel rebar. Poke it into the ground at least a foot very close to a clump of daylilies and then remove it. Fill the hole with bone meal or superphosphate. Repeat around the clump for 3-4 holes.
If you divide a clump, stir a handful of bone meal into the bottom of the planting hole. Before you set a division, sprinkle a little plain soil above the portion with the bone meal so that the disturbed roots of the division are not in direct contact with the bone meal.
Sunset says to divide in the early spring or late fall in my climate. In cool-summer areas or areas with short growing seasons, divide in the summer.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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Maria said:

Has the area become more shady over the years as trees have grown? (This is a common problem as landscapes mature.) Daylilies flower best with full sun.
If they are still getting plenty of sun, then the answer would probably be to divide the clump and amend the soil to improve fertility. Phosphorous being the key nutrient, as David mentioned.
--
Pat in Plymouth MI

"Vegetables are like bombs packed tight with all kinds of important
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Maria, you got good advice already from others. I will just add the remark that most daylilies bloom only once each year. The exceptions are so-called rebloomers. Do you have rebloomers? They need even more phosphorus than regular daylilies.
    Una
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On 3/26/10 3:23 PM, in article hoj1ip$aek$ snipped-for-privacy@doliolum.localnet, "Una"

And one more - check the root systems for mole damage.
Cotton seed meal is a great source for amending your daylilies soil.
Cheryl
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