Crabapple setbacks

Last Autumn I bought two crab apple trees (Evereste and White Star
which were potted and in full fruit.
They were planted correctly in their supposedly favourite clay soil but this year the Evereste has one apple, and the White Star about 20
Both trees appear to have established and are in no danger of dying.
They came from a reputable East of Scotland grower, but I can't hel feeling that they must have been forced to have been so laden wit apples in a 10-inch pot.
Or have I done something wrong? I am a beginner with crab apples, s any help at all would be very welcome
-- Crabapple
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Don't know a whole lot about crabapples in particular, but often the mere putting of a plant in a small pot will encourage flowering (I believe the evolutionary origin of this trait is that a plant which is stressed in various ways tries to reproduce, in case it doesn't make it). No doubt there are other ways that the nursery could have forced the flowers. Since plants which are in flower sell for more than ones which aren't, it isn't especially shocking, nor especially worrysome in terms of your long-term success with the plant.
My rule of thumb with woody plants is that I don't expect flowers/fruit for at least the first year (longer for some plants).
If it goes another year or several without flowers, then I'd start wondering about fertilization (e.g. too much nitrogen), not enough sun, etc. But the fact that you didn't get a bloom the first year they were in your soil doesn't strike me as unusual or problematic.
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Jim Kingdon;753296 Wrote:

Thanks very much, Jim, for your reply.
I should have said that the trees did flower slightly this Spring.
But that's good news about the prospects for future fruit - I'll kee you up to date with any future developments.
Interesting about the stress caused by potting a large tree in a smal pot, too. You live and learn.
Thanks again
-- Crabapple
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I wouldn't worry, the tree is probably diverting it's energy into root development in lieu of fruit production. Also remember that birds, squirrels and other wildlife will eat some of your fruit which is OK in the case of a crabapple.
-al sung Rapid Realm Technology, Inc. Hopkinton, MA (Zone 6a)
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Alan Sung;753643 Wrote:

Thanks for that, Al.
I am starting to feel more confident by the day!
The trees cost 35 each, so you'll understand my sense of investment
-- Crabapple
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Crabapple wrote:

Replanted trees typically go into shock. That the foliage is fine is a good indication that all is well. Those trees are simply diverting their energy from flowering to rooting Have patience, could be a couple-three years before those trees establish a root system and fully recover
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