Chimayo chile in chimayo?

If you're familiar with Chimayo chile perhaps you can help. I have grown th ese from seed given me by people in Chimayo, New Mexico. It is very hot and the sauce it makes is almost orange in color. The ground powder looks like the 'Chimayo Heritage' chile sold at the vigil store there.
But you can also buy 'Chimayo chile' that produces a dark red sauce that ha s the same fruity, tea-like tannin flavor, more complexity but not as much heat. The vigil store has that too, so does the store across the road and L eona's tamale stand by the church. I don't think it's the same cultivar. Do es anyone here know what it might be? I read once there was a variety grown that was more consistent the the original Chimayo chile but can no longer find any reference.
Grateful for any help.
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On 04/21/2015 05:54 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

For those not familiar with Chimayo peppers, they are the flavor in an enchilada. They are also known as "New Mexico Red" chilies. They are my favorite chili. Both heat and flavor. Most peppers are just heat.
Hi Eastman,
If you would forgive a little conversation that doesn't actually answer your question, this is my source of Chimayo (a.k.a. New Mexico Red) Chili powder.
http://www.americanspice.com/chimayo-chile-ground/
It is on the hot side, but cools when exposed to fat, like heavy whipping cream and butter.
I also buy the dried ones from the local Mexican supermarket. (No sulphides!) Funny: the Mexicans in the local supermarket are the sweetest people on the face of the earth, but they won't call a Chimayo pepper a Chimayo pepper. That is just a place. Peppers are grown everywhere. Presumably, where they have roots grows the best peppers! :-)
The heat is mainly in the seeds. And grinding them would cause a much hotter powder with a lighter completion. Maybe that is what you noticed?
When I use the dried peppers (I love to smell the bag when I open it), I break off the tops and dump what seeds will fall out into the trash.
I use the dried peppers in my Chicken Broth, among other things. Chimayo is my secret ingredient in my Ratatouille. Just enough to add a flavor accelerate. I use it in place of chemical excitotoxins (MSG, Yeast Extract, etc.) as a flavor accelerate. The powder goes on more things than I will admit to.
I substitute Chimayo powder for Cayenne powder in my home made Emeril's Essence Seasoning. Anyone who wants the recipe, let me know. It is great on chicken, fish, eggs, etc..
My hat is off to you for actually being able to grow these peppers. I can not grow a pepper for my life (I have a black thumb).
-T
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