Cannas and lilies

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snipped-for-privacy@netscape.net (paghat) expounded:

Same here, for mostly the same reasons. I'll write it into the P&S. And leave some of whatever is dividable.

Sounds like fun. Nekkid garden raindancing :o)

Sounds like lots of good reasons. Prices around here are unbelievable, and the taxes are equally unreal. I dream of moving up to Maine, hubby would be thrilled if I did finally sell here, but it's so hard to leave 27 years of gardening and family memories......We'll see.
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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If you have no choice, then dig them out with as much soil on their roots and put them in huge tubs or Rubbermaid rectangular things you buy at Target. Do cut them back and the worst that will happen is you may lose some, and the lily's may not bloom next year. If you live in the south, hmm, sketchy if this would work. Here where I live has been 100+ for days with no let up in sight.
On Tue, 23 Aug 2005 08:26:09 -0400, "Cindy"

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Cindy wrote:

Keep in mind that when you planted them in the ground, they became part of the real estate. They are now a fixture.
The new owner has every right to expect they'll stay right where they are unless you have negotiated something differently. And if they don't remain where they are, the new owner can sue for the cost of restoring them. (And they don't even have to restore them. They can just say, "They're missing; pay us.")
The exception to this would be annual crops planted commercially. In that case, the harvest is an embalmment, and belongs to the farmer who planted them (whether this is the owner or a renter). It wouldn't apply to perennial food crops like berries, grapes or tree fruit, nor would it apply to a personal vegetable garden.
The time to think about this is before accepting an offer for the real property, and then only accept an offer with the terms already in there, or make a counter offer including those terms. Once you've accepted an offer, the new owner is under no obligation to even consider your request to dig-up the fixtures.
--
Warren H.

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