Best time to transplant a Redbud

I have a Redbud that's been growing for the past couple years in my garden (I got it as a "stick" from the Arbor Day foundation). It's about 6 feet tall now and I want to transplant it.
When is the best time to transplant? I would think late winter/early spring, but I have also heard late fall when the leaves drop. Any advice would be appreciated.
I live in Zone 5b / coastal NH.
Thanks in advance.
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I would do it right before or right after first frost. That way the tree can develop new root structures over the winter without losing its ability to uptake water. Make sure you do water it all winter if it doesn't rain or if no snow melts.
Start now by taking a sharp shooter or sharp shovel and cutting around the tree at the drip line to prune the roots. Before it gets too cold and the ground too hard and wet, dig the hole. Fill it with fallen leaves till you are ready to transplant. Do not fill anything back with the natural soil you remove and make sure you dig a jagged hole with no smooth sides. Also make sure when you plant it that you do not plant it too deeply. It is always better to be planted an inch or two high in the hole than deeply.
I don't recommend transplanting trees in spring.
Victoria
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Why wouldn't you transplant in Spring? And in Coastal NH the first frost is around mid October and the ground is frozen solid by Jan 1 (or before). Is that enough time for the tree to set new roots?
Thanks again.

garden
spring,
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Toonartist wrote:

When you transplant a tree in the spring, it has to produce new roots and new leaves at the same time. OTOH, if you transplant it in the fall, it can spend it's time making lots of healthy new roots. And, yes, the 2-1/2 months between frost and freeze should be plent of time for this to happen.
Chris Owens
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Just a small side note... You want it early enough in fall for it to form roots before it becomes too cold to do so but late enough that it isn't trying to grow new leaves.... For you I would say soon (actually now). DKat

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