yellowing leaves on chili pepper plant

I have a pepper plant in a 2 cubic ft container on my deck, and something is not right about it because it's leaves are starting to turn yellow. It used to be dark green, but it's now yellowish green, so I assume it needs some fertilizer, but I'm not sure if it needs mostly N, K, P or Fe and/or some other trace element.
It was originally planted outside of my home in '99, but it was dug up after the first frost, and it's been in the same container ever since, either inside or outside, depending on the weather.
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Yes.
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Peppers (and Tomatoes) are not actually annuals, but perennials. They are native to tropical climes and in those enviroments they can live for many years. If they are brought indoors during the winter and kept in a relatively warm and moist room they can be replanted in the late spring and continue to thrive...
As to the yellowing...no idea...

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It's pretty much all the leaves that are turning yellow, a few with brown splotches....
Overwatering could be an issue as I watered it a little more than usual during a recent heatwave, which were promptly followed by a few downpours.
I did some google search, and came up with magnesium, manganese, and iron as possible minerals pepper plants could be lacking, but I'm not sure about the symptoms the lack of these might cause.
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Oh yeah on the other 2 nutrients it says...
Iron is necessary for many enzyme functions and as a catalyst for the synthesis of chlorophyll. It is essential for the young growing parts of plants. Deficiencies are pale leaf color of young leaves followed by yellowing of leaves and large veins. Iron is lost by leaching and is held in the lower portions of the soil structure. Under conditions of high pH (alkaline) iron is rendered unavailable to plants. When soils are alkaline, iron may be abundant but unavailable. Applications of an acid nutrient formula containing iron chelates, held in soluble form, should correct the problem.
Manganese is involved in enzyme activity for photosynthesis, respiration, and nitrogen metabolism. Deficiency in young leaves may show a network of green veins on a light green background similar to an iron deficiency. In the advanced stages the light green parts become white, and leaves are shed. Brownish, black, or grayish spots may appear next to the veins. In neutral or alkaline soils plants often show deficiency symptoms. In highly acid soils, manganese may be available to the extent that it results in toxicity.
face=Arial size=2>...<BR>&gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt; If your plants are turning a mottled brown and yellow with splotches,<BR>&gt; &gt; it is probably a blight.&nbsp; Peppers are relatives of the tomato and are<BR>&gt; &gt; susceptible to the same diseases.&nbsp; If, however, the bottom leaves are<BR>&gt; &gt; just turning yellow, it is probably simple choriosis (yellowing)<BR>&gt; &gt; caused by excessive watering.<BR>&gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; It's pretty much all the leaves that are turning = yellow,<BR>&gt; a few with brown splotches....<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Overwatering could be an issue as I watered it a little<BR>&gt; more than usual during a recent heatwave, which were<BR>&gt; promptly followed by a few downpours.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; I did some google search, and came up with magnesium,<BR>&gt; manganese, and iron as possible minerals pepper plants<BR>&gt; could be lacking, but I'm not sure about the symptoms<BR>&gt; the lack of these might cause.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; </FONT></BODY></HTML> ------=
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On Mon, 11 Aug 2003 15:28:20 -0700, "Grilled Spam tastes yummi !!"

burning the plant. Overwatering could have leached those minerals as well as cacium from the soil. Ironite will replace it. Another good source for calcium is pure Epsom Salts.
Lee Zone 7
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Thanks a lot for the excerpts -- based on your citations it appears to me that my plant could be lacking all of Fe, Mg, and Mn, but at the very least 2 of the above -- Fe and Mg for sure, and probably Mn, too.
I might actually have some KMnO4 and FeCl3, but I'm not sure if they make a good fertilizer.... ;-)
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Just be careful not to think too much into it. It's very easy to get bogged down in the details of mineral deficienies and plant diseases and drive yourself crazy trying to treat all these percieved problems. I would highly recommend having an extensive soil test done if you are pretty sure your problem is a mineral deficiencies. Your local agricultural extension will probubly do these tests for free, just request a full trace mineral work-up. It's important to be sure becuase having too much of some minerals can be as bad or worse than not having enough, and you could accidentally overdose your plant. Just be careful.
One thing no one has mentioned yet is SALT. It generally requires quite a bit in order to hurt your plants but it is possible. If you are using softened water to water your plants it can build up in the soil and cause symptoms similiar to what you are describing. If you happen to live fairly close to the ocean, particularly on the West Coast where the air currents bring rain from off the ocean, it could also have built up in your soil. If nothing else its something to consider.
As to the minerals, Ironite is good for the iron issue, and for magnesium you can try Epsom Salts, applied as a spray mixed with water. About 2 tablespoons per quart I believe is considered a good mixture. I am not sure what provides magnease.
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Opps, I MEANT to say for a FEE. Some might possibly do it for free, but if you request a full mineral work-up it will probubly cost ya. Here in WV it was $30 for a full trace mineral test per sample...
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Sounds like a plan, good luck buddy...
:)

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Thanks, I might need some as the plant is in a rather bad shape -- I try no to lose my year around pepper supply.....

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