winter squash not maturing

I've planted a winter squash this year called Lakota. The vines are very productive and healthy looking, but every fruit turns yellow and withers shortly after the blossom withers. Help! Is this a nutrient problem? Everything else in the garden is healthy. There are plenty of insects visiting the blossoms (and plenty of simultaneous male blossoms) so I don't think it's a pollination problem. At this point I wonder if I'll have any mature squashes.
Our summer so far (N MD) has been fairly wet, with about average warmth. Any tips appreciated!
Orin Hargraves
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I would bet that it is a pollination problem in spite of evidence to the contrary. Go out in the morning on a day when rain hasn't washed away the pollen. Pluck a male flower, remove the petals, and use the resulting "paint brush" to pollinate a couple of fresh female flowers. If those flowers produce a squash, you'll know the bees haven't been doing their job. If I'm right about the pollination, the problem will probably solve itself after the weather gets a little warmer and dryer. Good luck.
Steve
Orin Hargraves wrote:

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I agree with Steve. I have grown Lakota and its usually a pretty trouble free squash. There are two reasons for the young squash to be aborted. One is lack of pollination. Check to make sure that honeybees, bumble bees, carpenter bees , or native squash bees are working. The other is stress on the plant. If you have bees and the plants are healthy then the squash should set as soon as the weather conditions are right for the plant. If you don't have bees or there is an abundance of other preferable flowers than hand pollination is the last resort.
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Thank you both for responding. I hand-pollinated a few females (squeamishly, as I felt I was forcing sex on them), and by coincidence, honeybees have now appeared in abundance, and fruits are maturing. So you're both right. Whatever insects were visiting before were just not doing the job I guess. Thanks again.
Orin
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Thank YOU for returning to bring this to a conclusion.
Steve
PS Rest easy. As far as I know, there has never been a conviction for molesting squash blossoms. :-)
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