Why Heirloom Tomatoes??

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On Thu, 18 Sep 2008 20:50:03 -0500, Omelet wrote:

The man I buy my coconut oil from would scream. Last time I bought it I got a free lecture on how heating the oil will make it not as healthy. I use cold pressed. I don't tell him how I use it....A bit of oil in the bottom of a cup. Stir small amount of cocoa powder into the oil. Add hot coffee, sugar and cream.....mmmmmmm.
Or as oil in the pan for making pancakes. Also replace butter in chocolate cookies.
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Meh, coconut oil has a high smoke point and a sweet flavor so is seriously suitable as a cooking oil.
When I'm going for the health benefits of specific oils, I'll steam veggies then coat them lightly with the uncooked oil before adding my spices.
And yes, I actually do do that. ;-) With Olive, Coconut and Grape Seed.
--
Peace! Om

"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed; if you do read the
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to this newsgroup: The density of self-appointed know-it-all "experts", with no discernible qualifications, who broadcast, wholesale, "mis" and "dis" information without citation or evidence of any kind, whatsover, as if it's "gospel".     In short, "Friend", you simply don't know what you're nattering about.
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I feel sorry for you babe.
The spam here is less than 1%.
If you cannot ignore/filter it, you may as well belong to Yahoogroups.com.
You will not benefit from the rich and diverse anarchistic (and wonderful) population that hangs out on usenet.
I pity you...
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Peace! Om

"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed; if you do read the
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As Ms. Omlet says, you're missing out on a lot. The OP came in from Garden Banter; always a bad sigh, breathlessly proclaiming something that, as my old Calc teacher said, was "Intuitively obvious to the most casual and simple-minded observer."
And yeah, ANY home grown 'mater beats those alien store things by [insert large distance unit here].
Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at home.earthlink.net/~garygarlic Zone 5/6 in upstate New York, 1420' elevation. NY WO G
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We do blindfold taste tests every year with our tomatoes every year. The heirlooms often rate highly in this regard. But not always. Some simply don't grow well in our climate while others flourish. Several of our favorites include Pink Caspian, Amish Paste, and Mortgage Lifter. However, we also grow many hybrids that rate highly as well.
The problem with most grocery tomatoes isn't that they are hybrids, IMO, but that they are bred to withstand abuse in shipping and so they look pretty on a store shelf--- no matter how tasteless and hard.
Isabella
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On Wed, 3 Sep 2008 11:53:22 +0100, rogers

I've been popping cherry tomatos for a couple of weeks now, but my first full size one ripened this week (I planted late.).
It was a Rutgers: Juicy and very tangy. One of my favorites. An excellent canner or to eat out of hand.
Just for fun: Rutgers (sometimes knows as Jersey) at one time accounted for 70% of all tomato sales in the US, bolstered by the fact that Campbells used them in their soups. As a matter of fact, the variety was created at Rutgers University in cooperation with the soup giant. It's parents are the Marglobe and JTD.
It made New Jersey the #1 tomato producer in the country at the time. California now holds the distinction.
When NASA did experiments with growing food in space from seed, the tomato seeds they used were Rutgers.
I planted 38 heirlooms this year, and it appears 35 of them made it. Hope they are all as tasty as this first one.
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JustTom wrote:

Rutgers is the only variety I planted this year. Yield has been poor, but they taste great. Been eating a lot of tomato sandwiches, BLT's, and pico de gallo, but won't have any to can or freeze.
I may plant Marglobes next year because they are bigger. And Principe Borghese because they do well here and are good for drying.
Bob
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