When's the LATEST I can start tomatoes?

I live in southern Utah, zone 7 or 8.
I started tomatoes a little too early this year (it shouldn't have been too early, but we had cold weather much longer than we usually do), and by the time it was warm enough to put them outside, they were stressed to the point where only about 6-8 out of 200+ made it.
So I started some new seeds a month ago. I planned to put the little plants outside yesterday, but right before that I went out of town and forgot to tell my husband to water them. I came home to find a hundred tomato seedlings flat and dead in their little pellets.
I planted more seeds yesterday. They should be ready to put into the ground in about a month. Am I just kidding myself, or do people actually start tomatoes with success this late in the season? I should say that in most years we don't get killing frosts until October or later, so our growing season is in fact quite long. Last year, my plants were about ten feet tall by the end of August, and really too pooped to produce much by then, even though the weather was still very hot for months afterward. So I am thinking that we might get tomatoes much later than anyone else, but at least the plants will still be healthy and producing at the end of the growing season.
Someone give me some encouragement! --S.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hope Charlie is about and well!
Bill
........... Path: border1.nntp.dca.giganews.com!nntp.giganews.com!newshub.sdsu.edu!news.ast raweb.com!border5.newsrouter.astraweb.com!news-xfer.nntp.sonic.net!posts. news.sonic.net!nnrp1.nntp.sonic.net!not-for-mail
Newsgroups: rec.gardens Subject: Re: Planting late Organization: Camp Runamuck
User-Agent: MT-NewsWatcher/3.5.2 (Intel Mac OS X) Date: Thu, 19 Mar 2009 14:15:01 -0700 Message-ID:
Lines: 82 NNTP-Posting-Date: 19 Mar 2009 21:15:05 GMT NNTP-Posting-Host: f5d2e0e4.news.sonic.net X-Trace: DXC=T2@d8KFmjI@L9dSKe`1h@Lm4K\QM1CV^@1OYf0H`?;XA6Kenn[og0`D9N8YebP\=^@hO> IUP8nF>OlSEnIE:kVgK X-Complaints-To: snipped-for-privacy@sonic.net Bytes: 3183 Xref: number1.nntp.dca.giganews.com rec.gardens:584758

This is out'en Charlie's archive. I only steal from the best.
Late Planting Guide From Seed From an Old Organic Magazine
Frost date is Oct 15 Last frost May 15
Your dates may differ due to your climate
July 4 100 days till Oct 15
Frost tender
85 days Snap Beans by July 25 97 days Corn by July 4 86 days Cucumbers by July 25 110 days Tomatoes by June 25 81 ays Squash by Aug 1
Survive Light Frost
90 days Cauliflower by July 25 84 days Chinese Cabbage by July 25 74 days Beets by Aug 15 113 days Endive by June 25 63 days Kohlrabi by Aug 30 76 days Loose Leaf Lettuce by Aug 1r 96 days Head Lettuce by July 4 70 days Peas by Aug 15
Survive Heavy Frost
99 days Cabbage by July 4 85 days Carrots by July 25 70 days Chard by Aug 15 90 days Collards by July 4 95 days Broccoli by July 4 120 days Brussels Sprouts by June 15 95 days Kale by July 4 42 days Radishes Summer by Sept 5 72 days Radishes Winter by Aug 15 64 days Spinach by Aug 25 51 days Turnips by Sept 15
-- People need to remember that these are average frost dates, for zone 5. I'm also zone five.
Some years things will be done in around the average date, other years it may go much later. Three years ago we were still harvesting tomatoes aaround thanksgiving time. I had covered a few plants when frost hit the end of october. No frost or freeze until around thnksgiving.
Charlie
An' that's the way it is, movin' on.
--

Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being is
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What kind of tomatoes are you growing? Glacier, Stupice, Sun Gold VFNT, Siberia, Shirley F1, Native Sun, Max, Kalinka, Ildi, Early Pick VFF, Alpine , and Early Girl are supposed to set in 60 days or less.
Glacier (det) is supposed to be for containers and only grow 30" tall. I have 2 in the ground, one is 30", but the other is 4'.
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Suzanne D. wrote:

You're better off direct-sowing them at this point rather than starting them indoors. Did you sow them in pellets or just scatter them in a half a milk carton (etc)? Put them out as soon as you can, and protect them from direct sun for a day or two. As long as you didn't plant a late-season variety you should be fine. The volunteer tomatoes here usually almost catch up with the early transplants.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I thought about that, but my current beds are quite "rough," made up mainly of last year's leaves. I could put a handful of commercial soil into a hole to plant the seeds, but I fear they'd get completely swallowed by the leaves.

I planted them in Jiffy peat pellets. About three seeds to a pellet.

What constitutes early or late varieties? Some of mine mature in 70-85 days, and others more toward 100 days. --S.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bbb_bus snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

Refer back to Billy's answer to your original post on this thread.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
7

OOOOOOOOHHH
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For those not taking notes;O) Glacier, Stupice, Sun Gold VFNT, Siberia, Shirley F1, Native Sun, Max, Kalinka, Ildi, Early Pick VFF, Alpine , and Early Girl are supposed to set in 60 days or less.
Glacier (det) is supposed to be for containers and only grow 30" tall. I have 2 in the ground since April 23, one is 30", but the other is 4', and both have green tomatoes.
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 13:05:13 -0600, "Suzanne D."

I would give it a try. I would set the plants outside as soon as they look big enough, maybe 3 to 4 inches tall. You may start getting some tomatoes in September. Whatever you get and whenever you get them will be great.
I have 7 (out of 61) tomato plants that looked sick. I cut the tops off and stuck them in some potting soil. After a few days they still looked bad so I tossed them, pots, dirt and all into the trash. I have started some more of those varieties. I will be putting these out as soon as possible.
I have the feeling that there is something in the soil in that spot. I need to get a soil test done, I have the boxes and paperwork.
--
USA
North Carolina Foothills
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Suzanne D. wrote:

I ran across this from So Cal that has a lot of data for planting time versus harvest time:
http://tchester.org/analysis/tomatoes/index.html
Here is my current take on growing tomatoes, although they will not set fruit if daytime temps are over 90F they also won't set fruit if nightime temps are lower than about 55F.
I believe that some early setting varieties are early because they set at lower minimum night time temp. (Got a ref somewhere for that, Billy).
So, what are your night time temps going to be in a couple months? How late in the season do your tomatoes set?
I'm thinking that you will do better to buy some plants already started.
Jeff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It gets pretty hot here; about 110 in days and 75-85 at night. (But by misting my tomatoes and putting them in partial shade I can get them to set fruit even in the high temps.) By the time my seeds are ready to plant outside, it'll be in the hottest part of the year. So maybe the "later" tomatoes wouldn't do so bad after all.

I did just that. I am still planting my seeds, but there comes a point where you either stick to your organic principles and accept that you won't be getting any tomatoes until September, or you swallow your pride and buy plants from the stores. A home grown hybrid tomato is still better for you than a store-bought tomato, anyway. So I picked up 55 plants from various nurseries, and hopefully I'll have a few of my neat heirlooms at the end of the year as well. --S.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.