Whats eating my indoor chilli plants?

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I'm guessing greenfly but I'm not sure. How best to get rid of them. I used some mild detergent in a sprayer and gently wiped them off with tepid water.
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If you use soap on plants, make sure it is a fatty acid based soap and not a detergent.
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First time poster, but I've been reading this newsgroup for awhile. I enjoy an 11.5 oz can of V8 every morning and got to thinking about making my own. Not so much to taste exactly like it, but as a way to not let anything from the garden go to waste.
I envision using tomatoes as a base ingredient and add whatever's ripe at the time. Is there a brand of juicer that would be preferable over say, a blender? I'd imagine retaining the maximum amount of nutritional value would invole a different process than just smashing vegies into juice.
We can and freeze, but there's always some goodies left over that I just hate to throw in the compost. I'll bet you could come up with some interesting flavors too ; ) Have any of you tried this?
Thanks
Newb
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snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.org wrote:

If you go to <http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/ you will see that pureed tomatoes generally contain more nutrients than tomato juice (indicative of the USA that they didn't have numbers for fresh tomato juice). The puree will, as you would expect, contain more fiber. I'd just think of it as gazpacho to which you can add cucumbers, celery, peppers, just about anything, along with some oil oil to help adsorb the fat soluble vitamins, and vinager to make it refreshing on a hot day. It is a great way to use excess tomatoes.
OT: Today is the 40th anniversary of Kent State. <http://english.aljazeera.net/programmes/2010/04/2010430134254342410.html

<http://www.democracynow.org/2010/5/4/on_40th_anniversary_of_kent_state
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In article

Below from Rec.food.recipes ..........................
XLayered Gazpacho Salad Diced Gazpacho Salad Gazpacho Salad Mexican Gazpacho Salad Gazpacho Salad Gazpacho Salad Caputo's Gazpacho Salad Cool Summer Gazpacho Salad
Layered Gazpacho Salad
Lemon-Garlic Vinaigrette (See Below) 1 bag Mediterranean lettuce blend 2 medium tomatoes, diced (2 cups) 2 medium cucumbers, diced (2 cups) 1 medium green bell pepper, chopped (1 cup) 1/2 cup finely chopped red onion 2 hard-cooked eggs, chopped 1 cup seasoned croutons
Make Lemon-Garlic Vinaigrette. Place lettuce in large glass bowl. Layer tomatoes, cucumbers, bell pepper and onion on lettuce. Pour vinaigrette over top. Cover and refrigerate 1 to 2 hours to blend flavors. Sprinkle eggs and croutons over salad. Toss before serving.
Lemon-Garlic Vinaigrette
1/2 cup olive or canola oil 1/4 cup red wine vinegar 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
Shake all ingredients in tightly covered container. Source: <http://www.bettycrocker.com/recipes/recipe.aspx?recipeid4050
Diced Gazpacho Salad
Categories: Salads Yield: 4 Servings
7 md Tomatillos 1/4 tsp Salt 1/2 tsp Oregano 1/4 cup Whole parsley sprigs Black pepper 1/3 cup Olive oil 1 sm Red onion 1 md Cucumber 1 lg Red bell pepper 1 sm Avocado
Remove husks from tomatillos and rinse. Dice red onion to yield 1/2 cup. Seed cucumber and cut into 1/2-inch dice to yield 1 cup. Seed red bell pepper and cut into 1/2-inch squares to yield 1 1/2 cups. Peel avocado and cut into 1/2-inch dice. Coarsely slice 2 tomatillos and combine in food processor with salt, oregano, parsley, and pepper to taste; chop fine. Add oil and blend. Cut remaining tomatillos into 1/4-inch dice. Combine diced tomatillos, onion, cucumber, and red pepper in a serving dish; toss with dressing. Add avocado and toss gently. Cover and chill for about an hour before serving to 4.
from Uncommon Fruits & Vegetables: A Commonsense Guide by Elizabeth Schneider
Source: Chicago Sun Times Source: <http://www.recipesource.com/fgv/salads/05/rec0581.html
Gazpacho Salad
Makes 6 servings
This colorful and spicy salad features the same combination of tastes and textures found in the famous cold Mexican soup. Try it with tortilla chips.
1-1/2 cups peeled and coarsely chopped tomatoes* 1 cup peeled, seeded and diced cucumber 3/4 cup chopped onion 1/2 cup chopped red bell pepper 1/2 cup fresh or frozen corn kernels, cooked and drained 1 tablespoon lime juice 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar 2 teaspoons water 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon minced fresh garlic 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon black pepper Pinch ground red pepper 1 medium head romaine lettuce, torn into bite-size pieces 1 cup peeled and diced jicama 1/2 cup fresh cilantro sprigs
*To peel tomatoes easily, blanch in boiling water 30 seconds; immediately transfer to bowl of cold water, then peel.
Combine tomatoes, cucumber, onion, bell pepper and corn in large bowl. Combine lime juice, vinegar, water, oil, garlic, salt, black pepper and ground red pepper in small bowl; whisk until well blended. Pour over tomato mixture; toss well. Cover and refrigerate several hours to allow flavors to blend. Toss together lettuce, jicama and cilantro in another large bowl. Divide lettuce mixture evenly among 6 plates. Place 2/3 cup chilled tomato mixture on top of lettuce, spreading to edges.
Source: <http://www.favoritebrandrecipes.com/Recipes/070/9907191070.htm
Mexican Gazpacho Salad
1 head iceberg lettuce 2 tablespoons thinly sliced green onion 1 cucumber, pared, halved and sliced 2 tomatoes, cut into wedges 1 green bell pepper, cut into thin strips
Salsa Dressing 1 cup tomato juice 1/4 teaspoon minced garlic 1/2 teaspoon chili powder 1 teaspoon lime juice 2 teaspoons flour 1 tablespoon diced green chiles
Core, rinse and thoroughly drain lettuce. Refrigerate in closed plastic bag or crisper. Prepare remaining ingredients. To assemble salad, cut lettuce into 4 wedges; arrange in spoke fashion in salad bowl. Combine green onion, cucumber, tomatoes and green pepper and heap into center of shallow bowl. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
Serve with Salsa Dressing.
Serves: 4
Source: <http://www.recipegoldmine.com/swsalads/swsalads20.html
Gazpacho Salad
1 md tomato, chopped 1/2 md cucumber, chopped 1/2 md green pepper, seeded and -chopped 1 celery stalk, finely chopped 1/4 cup onion, chopped 1 Tbsp parsley, freshly chopped
herb dressing: 3 Tbsp Red Wine Vinegar 2 Tbsp Lemon Juice, freshly -squeezed 1 Tbsp Olive Oil 1 tsp dijon-style mustard 1/2 tsp oregano 1/2 tsp garlic powder
Instead of blending the vegetables to make the traditional soup, stop at the chopping phase and serve as a salad. Combine first 6 ingredients in a 13 x 9 x 2-inch baking dish. Combine all ingredients for the Herb Dressing and mix or whisk until thoroughly blended. Pour dressing over the vegetables; toss gently Chill at least 2 hours. Arrange lettuce leaves on serving platter. Spoon salad over leaves and serve.
Yield: 5 servings
One Serving = 1/2 cup Calories: 57 Protein: 2 g Fat: 3 g Carbohydrate: 7 g Fiber: 2.8 g Cholesterol: 0 mg Sodium: 34 mg Potassium: 335 mg
Exchange: 1 Vegetable 1/2 Fat
Source: "The U.C.S.D. Healthy Diet for Diabetes, a Comprehensive Nutritional Guide and Cookbook," by Susan Algert, M.S., R.D.; Barbara Grasse, R.D., C.D.E.; and Annie Durning, M.S., R.D.
Source: <http://www.recipeland.com/recipe/10052/
Gazpacho Salad
2 tomatoes, chopped 1 cucumber, chopped 1 green pepper, chopped 1/4 cup onion, chopped 1 qt. jar with screw lid
1/4 cup olive oil 2 Tbsp. vinegar 1 sm. garlic clove 1/2 tsp. salt 1/8 tsp. pepper 2 tsp. chopped parsley
In a one quart jar alternate layers of tomato, cucumber, pepper, onion to make stripes. Mix dressing ingredients and pour over layers of tomato etc. Screw lid on tightly. Chill overnight. Turn upside down for part of chilling time to marinate evenly. Pour into salad bowl to serve. Serves 6.
Source: <http://www.cooks.com/rec/doc/0,1843,144188-245195,00.html
Caputo's Gazpacho Salad
1 cup long grain rice, cooked 1/2 cup chuncky style salsa 1 clove fresh garlic, minced 1/2 cup V8 juice 1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1 Tbsp red wine vinegar 1/2 tsp chili powder 1/2 lb. crab meat (or imitation crab) 1 large cucumber, peeled, seeded and chopped 1 large tomato, seeded and chopped 1 green bell pepper, diced 2 celery stalks, diced 4 green onions, chopped 2 ears fresh corn, kernels removed from cobs 1 bunch cilatro, chopped red leaf or butter lettuce leaves 2 fresh limes sliced Tabasco or other hot sauce
In a shaker jar combine the salsa, garlic, V8 juice, olive oil, vineagar and chili powder and shake well. Refrigerate until you are ready to prepare the salad. In a medium mixing bowl combine all the remaining ingredients except the lettuce leaves and lime slices, toss well with the prepared dressing. Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours before serving.
To serve, place a lettuce leaf on serving plates, spoon a serving of the sald onto each plate and garnish with lime slices. Pass around Tabasco or other hot sauce for those who like theirs a little spicier.
Source: <http://recipes.ksl.com/recipe-10719i.php
Cool Summer Gazpacho Salad
Prep Time 20 minutes Chill Time 1 hour
3 cups fresh DOLE Tropical Gold Pineapple, cut into chunks 2 cups chopped tomatoes, drained 1 large cucumber, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced 1/4 cup chopped green onions 1/4 cup red wine vinegar 4 teaspoons olive or vegetable oil 1/2 teaspoon dried basil leaves, crushed
Stir together pineapple and remaining ingredients in large bowl. Cover; chill 1 hour or overnight to blend flavors. Stir before serving.
Source: <http://www.favoritebrandrecipes.com/Recipes/745/1511002745.htm
-- Rec.food.recipes is moderated by Patricia Hill at snipped-for-privacy@swcp.com. Only recipes and recipe requests are accepted for posting. Please allow several days for your submission to appear. Archives: http://www.cdkitchen.com/rfr/ http://recipes.alastra.com/
..................
I like Neil Young a lot . Kent 40 years I was 22 .
Forget it OHIO.
<http://www.thrasherswheat.org/fot/ohio.htm
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Don't Forget it OHIO.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRX4R9cYeDQ

--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
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On Tue, 04 May 2010 14:39:18 -0400, Bill who putters

:snip:
Outstanding recipies, thanks Bill! My mouth is watering here. I'd better go subscribe to that newsgroup too ; )
Newb
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wrote:

Thank you! That's a great site, and I'd never heard of gazpacho before. Definately added that to our 'we've got to try that' list.
Newb
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On Wed, 05 May 2010 09:21:32 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.org wrote:

Gazpacho, one of the great things that makes growing one's own tomatoes truly worthwhile.
Ross.
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snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.org wrote:

I am not a big fan of V8 but there is no reason that you cannot make a nutritious and tasty juice out your own veges. I think the vitamin content will depend more on freshness than how you extract the juice.
It is generally considered poor form to hijack threads by renaming them and starting a new topic. You would do better to start your own thread.
David
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snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.org wrote:

A blender would be better than a juicer. A juicer does a poor job of straining soft fruits. A food mill or food stainer is much better for soft fruits like tomatoes. I find the seeds and skins can give a bitter taste to the juice. The food strainer removes the seeds and skins. For fresh I would use a simple food mill. A powerful blender is easier to use and can pulverize the skins and small seeds. However I will sacrifice the extra nutrition and fiber that the skins and seeds may have over taste.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)73014905&sr=1-3
When the tomatoes come in, I preserve my own tomato juice and use that for my base tomato drinks. I consumed my last jar of my homemade: tomato juice two weeks ago, salsa two months ago, whole tomatoes three months ago, I still have four jars of sauce left. I am planting more tomatoes this year.
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Enjoy Life... Dan

Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.
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On Tue, 04 May 2010 19:51:46 -0400, "Dan L."

Do you have one of those, Dan? One of the three reviews on that is less than stellar.
Newb

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snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.org wrote:

Yes, I have that one and I like it. The all stainless steel ones can take the heat from canning and they cost over $200 US. Do they do a better job - I do not know. The one I have has a plastic hopper so I let the tomato puree cool a little bit before straining. The hopper can warp (I'm told) if the puree is too hot (Mine is fine has not warped). However when canning tomato juice it gets reheated again anyways during the canning process. I pressure can all of my tomato products. I have also used the water baths and found no difference in taste.
The Roma Strainer does a great job for juices and sauces. However the Salsa attachment does a poor job. Best make salsa with a knife for a chunky salsa. With the Roma strainer one can process two bushels of tomatoes in an hour.
The MUST book to have for canning is "Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving" (Amazon.com product link shortened) f=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid73104373&sr=1-1
Once you taste your own homemade tomato juice you will NEVER go back!
When not canning and for a single use, I use simple food strainer like: (Amazon.com product link shortened) ZDFN/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid73105530&sr=1-3 I do not own this one but something like it.
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Enjoy Life... Dan

Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.
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The juicer that gets the most ticks amongst cancer survivors is the Champion, but it's expensive. The enemy of good juice is air and centrifugal juicers or blenders are considered inferior to ones that don't allow excess contact with air.
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wrote:

I'll run the Champion by my wife. That looks like a top quality unit.
Thank you
Newb
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On Wed, 05 May 2010 10:13:15 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.org wrote:

I just ran across one on eBay earlier today. Item # 120565384465 Looks like a pretty good deal considering the cost of a new unit. In fact, if the description is true, it's more like a steal than a deal. And no, I'm not the seller, 'cause I wouldn't sell mine for that and I don't have all those accessories.
Ross.
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FarmI wrote:

I have owned a Champion for over 15 years and like it very much. I haven't tried it, but here is the V-8 recipe from the Owner's Manual:
--------- Cut here --------- Champion V-8
5 to 6 carrots 1 beet 3 large tomatoes 1 bunch spinach 1/8 cabbage head several kale leaves 1 red bell pepper 1 stalk celery 1/4 sweet onion 1/2 clove garlic chili pepper (optional) salt (optional)
Juice everything. --------- Cut here ---------
Notice there is no cooking to extract the juice. Everything is raw.
The Champion also excels in removing seeds from berries for making seedless wild blackberry jam, for example.
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The "Champion" juicer does seem very interesting. For juicing HARD fruits, juicers are needed. However those other SPIN base juicers NEVER did a good job on SOFT fruits for making tomato based or grape based drinks.
When I look at the "Champion V8", tomatoes are not the main ingredient by volume. So the one who owns the Champion juicer.
How does it perform for soft fruits only, like tomatoes? Does it have to be followed by a hard fruit to help push it through? How many apples can it juice in an hour?
If it can do soft fruits without the hard, I may want one myself :)
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Enjoy Life... Dan

Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.
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Dan L. wrote:

First, a little anatomy of the juicer. The first thing you notice is the big, heavy electric motor. It's 1/3 horsepower and has enough torque to jolt the whole unit a bit on its rubber feet when you first turn it on. I have never stalled this motor. One end of the motor shaft is extended with a shaft that has a "D" shaped cross section. The cutter is roughly bullet shaped and fits directly onto this shaft. No gears, direct drive only. The cutter has strips somewhat like a very coarse hacksaw blade embedded parallel to the shaft axis. The body surrounds this. At the top of the body is the feed tube, directly across at the bottom is the screen and at the end away from the motor is the discharge tube. Food enters at the top, gets chewed up immediately and is pressed and forced against the screen. Anything that doesn't go through the screen eventually exits out the end through the discharge tube.
1) The Champion will juice stuff from wheat grass to beets, carrots and potatoes without adjustment. The only thing you have to do with tomatoes is to cut them into wedges small enough to fit into the feed tube. The juice comes out through the screen at the bottom and the seeds, pulp and most of the skin are ejected from the end. You can even juice watermelon and cantelopes. Just peel or cut off the rind, seed and cut into wedges first. Soft fruit only has to be stemmed, pitted and cut into pieces that will fit inside the feed tube. Leave the peel on.
2) The juicer does not feed itself. A food tamper or pusher is part of the deal. You use this to control the rate that things happen. Pushing slower gives you drier pulp and more juice, rapid pushing gives relatively less juice and more pulp. If the pulp is too liquid, you can always run it through again to produce more juice and a drier pulp. With blackberries, I sometimes run the pulp through another couple of times before I think it's dry enough.
3) Estimating a rate of 1/4 apple pushed through in two seconds, another two seconds to remove the tamper, add another quarter apple, replace the tamper and start pushing again, a cycle time of four seconds, I would say you could do 4 apples a minute or over 200 apples per hour. Of course, you're going to have to stop from time to time to dump the juice and do something with the pulp.
The critical thing I've found is how to deal with seeds. The seeds in blackberries are small enough to pass between the rotating cutter and the stationary screen. No problem here. As a matter of fact, I've put apples through without coring them, although the manual says to core the apples first. When I tried to juice some Concord grapes, I cut them in half and tried to remove the seeds, but missed a few. I didn't tear up the machine, but I definitely knew when a seed was going through. So, my conclusion is that seeds the size of a blackberry seed or smaller are no problem, seeds the size of Concord grape seed or larger should be removed first and in between is kind of a gray area.
Champion has a free download of a PDF of their owner's manual and recipe book, complete with assembly illustrations and helpful hints. Go to <http://championjuicer.com/download/Champion-Juicer-Recipe-Book.pdf .
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Do you have the grain flour attachment? I wish I new about this before I got the Jack's Power Juicer :(
I will have to think about this one when the garden comes in. I will keep my roma strainer it does a good job for canning food stuff.
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Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.
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