using cut grass as mulch for vegetable plants

My gardener, after having screwed up once again by not bringing enough mulch for the vegetable garden, wants to put the grass he cuts in the garden to prevent weeds.
For some reason I feel like this is a terrible idea. I don't like the look and what if there are weeds with the cut grass that take root?
What do you all think?
Alan
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I don't see a huge problem with it Alan. You may not like the look, that is your prerogative absolutely. As for weeds, if you have a weed freeish lawn there is not much to worry about probably. Unless your grass is seeding the chances of grass seed is virtually nil. Grass will not regrow itself from clippings. It will need a root system that is very intact and fresh. I will add a rider there, the grasses I am familiar with like ryes and fescues. Lets say some seed does get down to the soil level, if the grass is thick enough it will smother most things trying to come through. If you have the garden constantly mulched there will be little growth of weeds. The odd one that pokes through can be hand pulled. I have used grass as mulch on gardens in rental properties before and did not have too much problem at all. The lawns were not that well tended and had who knows what growing in them.
rob
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We have used grass clippings for the last 25 or so years on our vegetable gardens. The only thing to worry about is whether or not an herbicide has been used on the grass. The grass decomposes well and provides nutrients to the soil.
If you do no like the look, that is another thing altogether.
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Susan N.

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I have a some questions of concern. It is not using the grass as mulch or the weeds that bother me. It is the chemicals that people use on their lawns that I wonder about. That is why I do not put grass in the mulch pile. I do use "weed and feed" on my lawn (I know, I am a sinner). Questions: Does weed killers in my grass clippings harm my mulch, therefore my veggies, therefore me? Does the herbicides brake down and does no harm? Does walking on a nice weed free lawn harm me :) Dan .....
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Andy comments:
If you have Bermuda grass, don't risk it.... if it manages to get a foothold in your garden from the seed, you will sorely regret it. Other types -- fescue, St Aug, rye -- should be no problem as long as seeds aren't there, and in those types it's easy to spot......
Andy in Eureka, Texas
( where there are NO brothels inside the city limits )
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I posted recently about this - I'm using grass clippings from the neighbors' yards as mulch. Someone wonderful mentioned that the issue of seeds pertains only if the grass is uncut long enough to form mature seeds - which a regularly cut lawn isn't. So I've been delighted with grass clippings mulch so far. We'll see how it goes.
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The only problem that I have found is that fresh cuttings tend to form a mat as they first decompose which repels water, this can lead to difficulty getting rain or applied water to penetrate. I find it better if you can allow the cuttings to dry and rot to some extent before applying.
David
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