Tying Tomatoes

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I use old stockings. I managed to get a bag full last year for about $1.00. We use 5' cages but some branches manage to escape and if you try to put back in, they break. Besides if you get all of the branches inside the cage, the plant can collapse.
--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral, 48 percent indignation,
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I made ties by cutting up the plastic carry-bags that every shop gives you. Slice a plastic bag into 1"-wide strips to make a lot of soft ties. Try stretching one of the strips to see how strong they can be. The bags aren't biodegradable so the strips last a season in the sun.
--
John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)


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writes:

I have built cages withc concrete reinforcement material. Cages are about 24" x 5' tall. Stake the cages with with rebar and tie wraps. Periodically put vertical reinforcement skewers as they grew taller. Probably twice per plant... Built a structure out of schedule 40 and covered with netting and tie wraps..
The result is healthy plants to 10' for the indeterminates, No birds to peck and ruin.. We are doing everything we can (freeze, can, dry and cook) to keep up with them!!!
I also cage my peppers a nd cucumbers.
What a bumper crop.

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Kurt,
Wht you wrote is so interesting but I don't understand 1/2 of it.
First, what is concrete reinforcement material? Do mean ready mix concrete or tht wire mesh they use?
What does stake the cages mean?
What is rebar?
Vertical Reinforcment skewers; I assume are stakes and you use two per plant?
What is schedule 40?
What ere the indeterminates?
You say you cage peppers and cukes, and I can see why, but I guess you make them lower than whatever you made for the tomatoes. Is that correct? I just can't envision what you made. I'm new to this and don't understand all the terminology.
Are your cages enclosed at the top and if not, how do you keep the birds out?

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writes:

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Dave wrote:

For me, no I don't use twine. I use the twist ties from the garbage bag boxes and sometimes yarn.
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I use cut rubber bands for my tying, that way there's some stretch to it before it starts to impede the plant...
- gulash
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I use cages for my tomatoes but for other plants such as clematis I use velcro. Just cut it to length and stick it on. I found it works great for a broken stem. Just cut a small piece and wrap it tightly to the stem. They mend very nicely on their own. The velcro is re-useable year after year and if a piece is too short stick two together. I love it.
And just where are you getting 10' tomato plants? My season must be way too short.
--
Dana
www3.sympatico.ca/lostmermaid
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too
Here's my method for dealing with 10' vines..
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Use cotton twine or velcro ties. Keep the stalks close to the post you are tying them on, or the weight will be hanging so far from the support that the first storm will tump them over. That's what happened to us this year. Hurrican season down here.
--
Garland Grower
Home garden is about 50 sq ft.
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