Reuse of spa water

When I change out my hot tub water, is it possible to reclaim any for use in the garden or in my large deck pots? Would the chlorine and other chemicals be too harsh on the plants? The chlorine is kept fairly low as I also use a silver cartridge as well as an ozonator, and could be allowed to evaporate easily enough. The pH tends to run low, although the alkalinity remains constant. I hate to waste 385 gallons of water if I don't have to. I was thinking if I put a covered barrel down below my deck and collect some of the water there as I drain the tub, I could use it as needed. Goomba
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If you leave the water out in the open long enough, most of the chlorine will go into the air. Cl's a gas at standard temperature and pressure. (Gases can be dissolved into liquids.)
Personally, I'd be more likely to water the lawn with it than the garden.
Puckdropper
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When does the ozone generator get used? Hopefully not when there is anybody in the tub. In commercial use, respirators and maximum ventilation are required. It protects us from ultra-violet but turns tires into dust. You do not want to breath it.
- Bill Cloribus gustibus non disputatum (but, not when it comes to breathing ozone. Don't do it.)
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William Rose wrote:

Ozone water systems are quite common in spas and hot tubs. No health alarms have been sounded over them that I'm aware of?
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Goomba, I am not an authority on the toxicity of O3 (ozone) however I've worked with it and I've been told to respect it. Somebody, somewhere must have found an acceptable LD50 level for it but,
the American Lung Association http://lungaction.org/reports/sota04_heffects3.html and, the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health & Safety http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/chemicals/chem_profiles/ozone/health_ozo.h tml apparently haven't given their imprimatur to it and, OSHA has set fairly strict limits to exposer of it. http://www.osha.gov/dts/chemicalsampling/data/CH_259300.html
I don't know but, if your going to get one, you should research it out first. It is not a no brainer. My observation is that it is really ridiculous that we are at the point where we need an advocate when we go into the market place. Who can know all this stuff? We do self-help in this news group but when it comes to GMOs, cloned meats, safe insecticides, drugs, and cell phones, we are the guinea pigs. Oh yeah, that goes for CEO Presidents too.(Remember that one?)
- Bill Cloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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In article

Sorry guys but you may want to take a gander at http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/ozonegen.html#is%20there%20such%20a%20thing%2 0as%20good%20and%20bad%20ozone as well. It is for air borne O3, which O3 is once it's no longer part of the solute, but reinforces the concept of not good. - Bill
Kent - I thought the King had more affected the Duke of Albany than Cornwall.
Gloster - It did always seem so to us: but now, in the division of the Kingdom, it appears not which of the dukes he values most; for equalities are so weighted that curiosity in neither can make choice of either's moiety.... (to be continued:-)
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