Re: Using bones for fertilizer?

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I've been wondering about this myself. I have a *lot* of bones I need to dispose of quickly. Is the garden a good place for them?
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Yeah, i'm running out of places to hide the bodies too.
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Our 150# black Newfoundland, Natasha (RIP) could smell bone meal a mile away and dug quite a few pits as a youngster. Fortunately she outgrew the habit after she was around two years old. I used to have to hose her off with the garden hose--- what a mess LOL.
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Interesting. But I wonder if it's still a problem? I guess that incident was around 7 years ago? I picked up a package of bone meal for my mom recently and it said some fancy smancy stuff about a "special steam purification process", so I wonder if that got rid of whatever attracts animals, and if something similar could be done with home-made bone meal etc.
-- Salty
P.S. I remember some people mentioning trench composting bones without any problems.
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On Thu, 31 Jul 2003 16:56:54 GMT, Salty Thumb

Being the paranoid person that I am, I wouldn't use bone meal in the garden because of BSE (mad cow disease). One case of it was recently reported in Canada.
I just wouldn't want to be spreading bone meal around my place, and certainly not in the garden with the edibles.
Pat
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I wondered about that too. I don't think they've found anything that kills prions yet.
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In article

The steam sterilization process will *not* kill BSE prions. (I'm a beef cattle rancher, and have been playing real close attention to the whole BSE deal.)
Jan
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snipped-for-privacy@xyz.net (Jan Flora) wrote in

All the more reason to figure out a way to home compost bones ... at least until 'crazy chicken' disease becomes a problem. :-)
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There are several thousand head of beef cows out on islands in the Aleutians (in Alaska) that we are trying to get the state to declare off-limits for now. They are quarentined herds, just because of location. The original animals were put on the islands by Russian fur traders in the early 1800's. If we ever needed clean (disease-free) stock to rebuild herds should the unthinkable happen (like the FMD massacre in Britian), those herds would be a source of clean stock, not to mention hardy genetics.
The commercial food supply sure is scary these days!
Jan
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wrote:

My thoughts precisely.
Pat
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What's your experience with heirlooms? Are they disease and pest resistant? I'd just love to grow heirloom 'maters, but getting any 'maters at all to grow at 59 degrees north latitude isn't easy. There are some old varieties from Russia, Czechoslovakia, etc. that are supposed to do well in cold climates. I want to start doing trials with them. (My SO just built me a little greenhouse!!! Late is better than never. There's always next year. *g*)
Stockgrowers who feed meat to herbivores should be run out of business. We feed our cows green grass in the summer and hay in the winter. And we feed our dogs fish and meat, not kibble that's mostly corn.
Jan
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resistant?
grow
climates.
Well, Jan like I said, this is the first year We've planted heirlooms. So far so good, we've been harvesting for a couple of weeks. Seriously, we have 30 plants, sometimes we use a wheelbarrow to bring them to the house. It may just be selective memory, but I can't remember tomatoes tasting quite as good, really they remind you that tomatoes are a fruit. Now here is the dilema, the ones we grow here, S.E. Va. will not work for you. They are beefsteak varieties. I tried that when I lived in upstate NY, if you like fried green tomatoes or green tomato pickles, they will work. You might try a google search for heirloom tomato, and then look for short season detirmenant. I bet you will find something you can use, especially with that greenhouse. It looks like you have already got some good ideas. We decided to use heirlooms specifcally because of the resistant factor. Last year, we picked our tomato sets from the local feed and seed, us and everybody else, had a really bad year. So we decided to change step. I am begining to believe that we are being decieved by the lables, by seed companies, as far as resistance is concerned. Now, cattle are herbivores dogs, like us are omnivores, leaning toward carnivores. Our dogs love trips to the garden, which is why I had to fence it, years ago. Len
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heirlooms.
town
She is right

wild
Nah she's just sweet dog, we have 4 blueberry bushes, in the front yard
and my dogs never forget it. Len
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It's *that* good?? I'll have to try it next year, in the greenhouse : )
(We're going to build a free-standing greenhouse, between the Cowboy Cabin and the tack shed, when we get time. It'll have power and be right alongside the water line that runs up to the horse pasture. Our hard winter winds come out of the northeast, and that site has 20' tall alders on the north side and the cabin on the east. By "hard," I mean 80-100mph winds. Our house is timber-framed, with a prow point into the prevailing winds and when the house shakes, it's blowing 100 mph. I live right around the corner from the Gulf of Alaska. Our normal winter weather would give most people the vapors.)
What heirloom stuff are you growing this year?

Your dogs are characters then, too. It used to crack me up to watch Toughie carefully pick the berries off the plants with her teeth. She didn't want to have to spit a bunch of leaves out. Black bears just strip the whole branch and eat the leaves, too. Which is why Tough always went berry picking with me -- she was one heck of a bear dog. She'd let me know if there was a bear within a 1/4 mile. (A major food source for bears in Alaska is berries, so most berry pickers bring someone along with a rifle or shotgun, to guard the pickers from bears. When you get busy picking, it's easy to forget to watch for bears.)
I buried Toughie up in the pasture next to the house last July. I'm going to have to borrow a dog to go berry picking this year. _But_ I got to babysit a most excellent dog this summer, while her dad went commercial fishing in Bristol Bay for sockeye salmon. I think Sandy would be a fine bear dog. She's a big buckskin-colored Boxer who kept the dang moose out of my garden all summer. Sandy's dad just got home, so I have to fence the garden now.
Jan
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On Tue, 05 Aug 2003 00:52:07 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@xyz.net (Jan Flora) wrote:

I'm the dissenting voice, I guess.
We grew Brandywines last year. They were wildly unproductive - I believe I had three ripe tomatoes from four plants! (Our climate's not ideal for tomatoes.)
I didn't think they tasted better than most other home-grown tomatoes. Maybe ours weren't representative.
In this fairly short-season, cool summer climate I will never try them again.
We're building a hoophouse (unheated) and I'll grow tomatoes in it next year, also peppers and eggplants. But I certainly won't try Brandywines in the hoophouse: space will be at a premium and they're just too unproductive for me. Even when they do ripen, I have read that they're not nearly as productive as some other varieties.
Pat
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I've heard that there are many strains called "Brandywine" around. I don't know how you would find the seed you're looking for though. (Maybe I'll ask the gal in town to save me some seed.)
Jan
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On Wed, 06 Aug 2003 13:06:06 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@xyz.net (Jan Flora) wrote:

I've read this also. I don't know how to find the 'good' strain either.
I have just joined the Seed Saver's Exchange - I'm sure lots of Brandywines will be listed on their exchange list.
http://www.seedsavers.org /
Pat
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snipped-for-privacy@xyz.net (Jan Flora) wrote in message

It is the best - and I don't just say that it is from the area (Chester/Lancaster Co, PA) :-)
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Seamus Ma' Cleriec) wrote:

Hey, are there any families named "Flora" still in Lancaster Co? My family lived there for awhile after they came from Germany in 1733. They are Church of the Brethern and Mennonites.
My gardening, stock growing and horse owning tendencies are genetic : )
Jan
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Jan Flora wrote:

I did a quick phone search for Flora in lancaster and 5 names came up.

Mine too. I am proud to be PA dutch, once now :)

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