Raspberries in full sun?

Do raspberries like full sun? Or do they perhaps prefer partial shade? I have a red variety but I don't remember what it is exactly. Out in the sun they look a bit stressed. I have some thornless blackberries in partial shade and they don't seem to like it. I would swap them but the sunny area is fenced and thus better for isolating something with thorns.
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replying to Davej , passerby wrote:

I think partial shade works best for them. I had a few raspberry bushes in a full sun spot and they were literally fighting for survival for three years until I moved them into the shade created by picket fence (and a medium size tree for a part of the day). They seem quite happy there, no yellowing and blooming rather well this year. It would be the first year in partial shade, so I'm not sure if less sun affects the taste of the berries, but at least the plants themselves look much healthier there.
That part of the garden is further away from the house, so the soil is not damaged by all the construction activity 6 years ago. So, perhaps there are several factors at play here, not just the amount of sun.
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passerby wrote:

I suspect that is the case. I don't have direct experience of raspberries (my soil is too heavy) but I have found that fruiting plants do require full sun, the more sun they get the more energy they have to make sugar for the fruit.
D
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Yellowing sounds more like a nutrient issue to me.
They are a crop that naturally (in the wild) goes for burned over land - full sun.
However if you are more equatorial (I'm around 42 degrees, so not equatorial at all) you may have a different issue with what "full sun" means for you, and what that does to crops which want full sun here. I don't mean full on tropical, just significantly closer to the equator, and thus getting more of a strong overhead sun.
They will _grow_ in partial shade, but not fruit as much as in full sun - here.
They also need to be thinned rather ruthlessly for continued production - either the simple brute force method of mow half the patch flat in alternating years, or cutting all the old canes and thinning the new ones to a pretty wide spacing.
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On Jun 13, 8:29 pm, Ecnerwal

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I have messed with various blackberries but raspberries seem to be a little different. I'm at 38.5N and the summer heat out in the full sun can be brutal. Since raspberries seem to have shallow roots I am going to need to keep them mulched and watered. These had been growing wild in a nearby wooded area for many years. I moved them last spring. I think they are descendants of some raspberries I grew briefly many years ago. Last year after the heat wave the canes started growing in a leggy ground hugging fashion. So far this year the new canes are growing erect, like a normal, healthy blackberry would.
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