Precast concrete for raised beds

I'm laying out a "four-square" garden at my place in central Maine. I'd like to use some kind of precast concrete planks to create the rectangular raised beds, but I haven't found much.
Anyone have any sources for concrete raised beds? I'd like to stick with long planks if possible so I don't have to do as much fussing and adjusting as they heave in the ground.
Thanks for any advice.
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Plain old concrete blocks do just fine. YOu can parge the exterior for a fancier look and put in slate or paving slabs on top for a seat.
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wrote:

I made a couple of 18 x 4 foot beds from concrete pavers. The pavers are 12in x 24in x2in. I trapped them in some surplus steel channel such that the blocks form 2 in thick walls 12 inches high. They seem to be working pretty well. I have enough scrap to build two more after the weather cools a bit in the fall.
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in my experience the pavers heave a lot more than cinder blocks. Cinder blocks, buried 3 inches at the bottom, are the best choice in cold areas. In all cases (blocks or pavers) the soil around them will be limed for at least one foot.
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Hm, I did not know that when I built my flower bed. I have not seen sign about the PH changes yet. Do I need to add something acidic? Soil here (Urbana, IL) is acidic to start with I believe.
Dong
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wrote:

I bet you need to do nothing. I figured it out myself when pH tests near the driveway came out about 1 to 2 units above those away from the driveway. Now that driveway has been there a long time, in MI it rains more than in IL, and certainly the concrete is more degraded than in a brand new paver (increasing the surface area). It is also possible that the base of the driveway has been filled with slag (broken concrete), which is cheaper than gravel.
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On 11 Jun 2004 06:30:29 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com (simy1) wrote:

Fortunately that is not much of a problem in Central Texas. I am not sure how they would work in a freezing climate. It would seem to me that the continuous steel channel would damp some of the heaving, but I don't know. So far I have seen very little evidence of leaching, certainly not out a foot from a 2 inch thick slab. Since our soil is pretty alkaline to begin, perhaps more things are adapted to the "lime" or the compost in the bed is buffering it.
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Do you get sectional concrete garages in US? The sections can be used for loads of things if you can find them. I know where there are some going begging in UK, but I'm not Fedex-ing them. :~))
Steve
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shazzbat wrote:

That's exactly the kind of thing I'm looking for.

Hmm . . .
My wife is going to be at Cambridge this summer. Maybe I can convince her to bring some back with her.
;-)
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