Nectarines in Zone 5??

I've had some wonderful nectarines this season and I dream of growing a tree one day and picking my own nectarines, even though I live in Chicago!
I've done some reading; looks quite possible to grow a tree from a pit, and actually get fruit. But then, how tall might the thing get? I'm a bit confused on how to process the pit in the first place, much more than to dry out the stone first. then it needs some time in the refrigerator, crack the stone and plant the seed within? Could I keep it indoors and take it out each spring for the summer and early fall?
anyone have any experience with this?
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I wouldn't bother. A grafted specimen will do much better and produce better fruit more reliably. Assuming that the thing will fruit at all where you are.

You could do that but the tree will necessarily be stunted unless you have it in a tub that needs a fork-lift to move.
I live in a much warmer climate (zone 9) so I don't have experience of zone 5 but you could have problems with any number of aspects of that climate, especially with late frosts knocking off your new buds in the spring. This doesn't sound like a good first project for a beginning orchardist to me but I will leave it to those who have lived in such a fridge to have the final word.
David
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On Wed, 27 Aug 2008, David Hare-Scott wrote:

hah!
I say, "if they can grow peaches in Michigan, why can't I?" (I do realize my dream may be unattainable, but I'm not moving to the South anytime soon, so ...) :-)
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Hmmm ...
The Peach festival in Romeo Michigan starts tomorrow 8-28-08. Just a few miles down the road :)
http://www.mipeachfest.com http://www.michiganpeach.org/peasrce.htm
Enjoy Life ... Dan
--
Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.

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On Wed, 27 Aug 2008, Dan L. wrote:

hrm. 5 hours away. :-(
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I would go to starkbrothers myself and order one. I don't have the patience to wait 6 or 7 years for fruit. with a bought one you would have fruit in as little as 2 or 3 years. yes they do have them hardy to zone 5
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wrote:

You'd probably be better off doing some research into varities and find something that has a reasonable chance of producing in Chicago.
A standard tree will grow 20-30 feet. You can get a dwarf or semi-dwarf from a reputable nursery that will only grow 12-20 feet.
I have a peach that bore it's first crop this year. It's really great to walk out the back door, pul one off the tree, bite into it and have the warm juice run down your chin.
The peach is a standard - I had enough peaches to put up 50 pints of peach jam.
- Mark
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wrote:

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Organic-Gardening/2008-06-01/Grow-Free-Fruit-Trees.aspx
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barbie gee wrote:

I get plenty of peaches here in a northern suburb of Chicago. Nectarines should behave similarly. As stated in another post, a grafted tree will bear fruit much sooner than a standard tree, and it is much easier to maintain.
Sherwin
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