Mushrooms In New Potting Soil

I am sowing seeds in 3.5 inch square plastic flower pots using Greenall Organic Potting Soil. I place the pots in 1020 treys with clear plastic domes and keep them near a window at a constant seventy degree temperature.
Most of my pots are growing volunteer mushroom fruiting bodies in the time it takes for the seeds to germinate (about five days).
I discussed this situation with experienced gardening neighbors and friends. They had never heard of such a thing. My nursery man had not seen this either, but offered to exchange or refund the soil.
My quandary is this: I am planting in container boxes and I don't relish the thought of live mycelium competing with my plants for territory. I will discard these 48 plants to get a clean start on the growing medium, but to do so will put me three weeks behind schedule.
My question is this: Is there a possibility the mushroom contamination of the potting soil will also be contaminated with other negative factors as weed seeds, bad bugs, mold, etc. I will not plant these guys if there is any possibility of a problem from it.
I am really saddened at this situation because the plants are vigorous and happy to be here working for me. But the garden project is a serious affair for me and that takes precedent.
I have thought to give them to other people to plant in the ground, but I don't wish to gift that which I will not use.
If anyone has advice or suggestions for me to consider I would sincerely appreciate hearing from you.
Kitamun
Central California twelve miles from the ocean Climate 10a snipped-for-privacy@realguns.com Separate Posting to Newsgroups: rec.gardens and rec.gardens.edible
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Mushrooms with fruiting bodies and your plants look healthy? I wouldn't worry about it. Your problem would be mold or mildew, something that grew on what you planted. The mushrooms aren't competing with the plants, they live on dead organic material. They may actually be making more of the organic material in the soil available to your plants.
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In article

I concur.
Mushroom growth is often a sign of very healthy soil.
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Mushrooms are a good sign of a rich soil mix. It probably had a fair amont of mushroom compost in the soil mix. Nothing to worry about. The mushroom mycellium is just breaking dead wood down into something your plants can use. I would not take your nursery mans advice about anything if that is his level of knowledge.
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