Move Established Asparagus Bed?

Happy Spring, all -
Has anyone tried to move an existing asparagus bed to a new location and been successful in that venture? If so, do you have any tips & tricks to share?
We're moving to a new home and I'd love to take my aspargus bed with and re-establish it in the new location. The bed consists of about 100 crowns ranging from 3-6 years' maturity.
Thanks ahead of time for any advice you might offer!
Jim
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I've never done it, but my aunt goes out into the field and digs up wild asparagus and transplants it into her bed. It seems to work for her. You have to dig a little deeper than you planted them and get as many roots as you can.
Dwayne

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G'day Jim, The conventional method of propagating asparagus's is to lift and divide clumps when dormant. A strong garden fork, a small axe, lots of bandaids and several beers. They are very tough plants, quite hard to kill, especially when they naturalise, and are traditionally sold as 'bare-root' crowns. They love a neglected garden, and can make an area unpassable when 'let go'. So I don't think you will have any problems, be they dormant or not. Start potting up some crowns now so they can get established. I understand that it can take up to three years to get new plantings up to proper production and good stem thickness. If you have an unusually good variety or a recognised cultivar, you might be able to get a local nurseryman to do all the work in exchange for as many crowns as you need. You may be surprised how many 'splits' they can get from a single established plant.
100 crowns? You must have a bit of space to play with then, lucky bastard ;-)
China Wingham NSW 065
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On 3/30/05 8:21 AM, in article d2ejjn$sn2$ snipped-for-privacy@grandcanyon.binc.net, "Jim

My first reaction was to say 'Just dig them up and go'! After thinking about it for a time I thought that the ground that they will be planted in should be properly prepared...you won't get another chance to put in compost or manure again later except for top dressing. So, having said that, prepare where they are going then 'Just dig them up and go'! Dividing them as you move them will become apparent as you go through the process. You may even end up with more plants than you thought you had...maybe you should expand your bed area...? I have an asparagus bed also...never thought about moving them, until now. Thanks for asking. Gary
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Jim Johnston wrote:

and
to
and
crowns
as others have said, time is of the essence if you want to do it now. In SE Michigan it would be too late, everything hardy is coming up right now. You could consider asking the new owner if you can remove half the crowns, then remove and replant them as quickly as you can (or keep them in wet sand until ready), then do not harvest this first year to give them a better chance to recover. Unless you have extreme clay, planting them now, and topdressing later, should work.
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And if you have extreeme clay?
email: dallyn_spam at yahoo dot com please respond in this NG so others can share your wisdom as well!
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in that case, bed preparation is better.
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I've never moved mine, but I expect you'd want the plants in the condition mine came in when I originally planted them. They were bare-rooted and with no foliage. So I'd guess that you dig them up in mid-winter, shake off most of the soil, and transport with the roots wrapped securely in damp paper or potting mix, etc., so they don't dry out.
I remember having to prepare the bed ahead of time, but just forget what was required.
--
John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)


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Thanks to all who responded to my post. Opinions seem to be evenly divided as to the feasibility/sanity of my plan so I think it's only fitting that I try to (promptly) move half the bed and leave the other half for whomever buys our old place. Hopefully they'll be asparagus fanciers.
Jim

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Hopefully they'll be asparagus fanciers.

Something to mention that has value.
Bill
--
Zone 5 S Jersey USA Shade garden in a Japanese manner
Vision problems? http://www.ocutech.com/ we own two.
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On 4/4/05 1:09 PM, in article No1SpamStill_ snipped-for-privacy@news.snip.net, "William Wagner"

Absolutely! "This house comes with it's own asparagus bed!"...up the price! Or you could just take it all...especially if they are not asparagus lovers. I guess asking them is out of the question...? Gary
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