mangoes

I posted this but saw no replies. Do we have no FNQ readers?
The tropical north of Australia has the ideal climate for growing mangoes. There is a variety that is never marketted, but you can find growing semi- wildly in twos or threes in open paddocks or some backyards in North Queensland, and this variety is known as turpentine mango. It has the un- mistakeable odour of turpentine--that's ordinary paint thinner here in Oz. When there are no other mangoes in season these turpentine mangoes are an okay substitute for the mango-deprived. They are smallish and a bit stringy, but it's like eating an ordinary mango in a room that has been freshly painted. You grow to like them but only when there are none better.
Any local readers able to say whether the turpentine mango is a native of Australia, otherwise where would it have come from? Perhaps early growers found that it was useful for pollination or something?
--
John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)


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John Savage wrote:

this site has a comprehensive history of the mango. can't vouch for its authenticity, just found it with google! hope it helps.
http://flavored-waters.com/mango_flavored_water.asp excerpt: In 1833, Dr. Henry Perrine shipped seedling mango plants from Yucatan to Cape Sable at the southern tip of mainland Florida but these died after he was killed by Indians. Seeds were imported into Miami from the West Indies by a Dr. Fletcher in 1862 or 1863. From these, two trees grew to large size and one was still fruiting in 1910 and is believed to have been the parent of the 'No. 11' which was commonly planted for many years thereafter. In 1868 or 1869, seeds were planted south of Coconut Grove and the resultant trees prospered at least until 1909, producing the so-called 'Peach' or 'Turpentine' mango which became fairly common.
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g'day john,
can't help much mate, i remember them when i was a kid they seemed to be quiet common around brissy.
as far as i can remember no one ate them that was almost impossible thing the smell was overbearing and the taste wasn't far behind. the ones i rememebr came from huge trees.
On Thu, 20 Jul 2006 06:03:39 GMT, John Savage
snipped With peace and brightest of blessings,
len
-- "Be Content With What You Have And May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In A World That You May Not Understand."
http://www.gardenlen.com
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