Large fruit trees for privacy?

What are the largest fruit trees? We're replacing an Indian Laurel Fig, which was about 30' X 30'. Are there any edible trees that get that big? We live in San Diego (Sunset Zone 24).
Thanks, -Carl
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Hi Carl, On the right rootstocks, apples and pears can get to over 20 feet high.
Sherwin D.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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A tremendous selection of subtropical fruit trees exists for cultivation in your coastal location. Springing to mind: citrus on std rootdtocks (grapefuit, lemon, orange, some mandarins, pummelo etc..). also, avocado,cherimoya, white sapote, mango,litchi (slowly), edible fig, macadamia, persimmon, carob, olive. Others which will get at least 15 - 20' include, loquat, pineapple guava, tropical guava, carambola, semi-dwf citrus (including limes and kumquats), jujube. Peaches, apples, nectarines, plums and pears all have varieties that are suitable for your mild winters too. Suggest visiting a local fruit tree nursery. Email me if you need some suggestions.
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elizabeth, Baton Rouge, LA
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Elizabeth wrote:

Avocado and carob trees are reasonably common on So Cal. They get *huge* in comparison to most other types of fruit trees. Maybe even too big to provide provacy. Plant a row and eventually their foliage will be higher than a person stands. The big trunks aren't much of a visual screen.

Maybe a combination of the tall trees and some shorter full ones? Pomegrante isn't very tall but it grows wide and full almost bush-like. If some fruit with a similar shape grows okay in the semi-shade under a bigger tree type, it should work.
The nursery that I could recommend from when we lived in Los Angeles is on Lankershem near the 170. Too far to go for someone in San Diego.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com writes:

Don't overlook nut trees, too. A big advantage is that they probably don't need all that regular insecticide spraying that most fruit trees demand. I don't know your US zone system, but the macadamia nut tree is a rainforest tree and can probably withstand light frosts at least once it is established (but check further before believing me). It's an Australian native, that's why I know of it. A native Australian fruit tree that has some varieties that grow massive, others quite compact, is the lillypilly. The fruit are cherry-sized, crunchy like an apple, taste like apple, and make delicious jam. In Australia it has no pests and the fruit doesn't need spraying though the leaf appearance can be spoiled by lerps.
You'll probably now tell me Zone 24 has snow 5 months of the year?!
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John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)


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Thanks John. Our climate is very mild, usually no frost in the winter, and not too much hot weather either. I know macadamia's grow here, along with citrus and avocado. I'll have to look up lillypilly. I had not heard of it.
-Carl
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com writes:

On second thoughts, the leaves are smaller than most fruit trees so probably not as dense as you may want "for privacy". Also the trunk doesn't seem to branch as close to the ground as do say, apple trees, so it depends on whether you want to block out neighbours at ground level or from a multi-storey block of apartments. Just avoid planting near a path because unless you pick all the fruit every year, it has to drop and rot and this makes a slippery mess on concrete for a couple of weeks. Over grass it's fine. There are many varieties of lillypilly, some are small compact trees, some huge and spreading, and I'd expect their fruit would differ a bit too.
Also, have you considered a mulberry? They do grow fast! and have dense leaves, but I think they drop their leaves in winter so your privacy would be seasonal but it means that the grass around the tree gets a chance to get some sunlight and grow. The birds will make a mess of nearby clotheslines, cars, balconies, etc. unless you net the tree, but you say you've had a fig so I expect you've had it netted or you would not have tasted any fruit; besides, the edible fig is deciduous, too, isn't it?
Then there's the quince, deciduous, but it will need spraying for some pests. The big advantage of the macadamia and lillypilly (I think lillypilly is the correct spelling) is that here in Australia at least it seems free of insect pests, though this might not hold in the US.
I'm wondering whether the tropical mango might do okay? It grows into a big tree, and has delicious fruit. I've heard conflicting reports about whether it does need spraying for fruit fly or not, though the taste of the fruit might make that worthwhile. How long it takes to grow and start fruiting is something I can't answer. It might be frost tender until it gets established. I think it is not deciduous but don't take my word on that.
--
John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)


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