How raised is raised

Page 2 of 3  
In article

Taken as a grain of sand.
Below longish.
<http://www.artofeurope.com/blake/bla3.htm
Bill feeling Blake like.
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Am sorry to hear of your low comprehension level regarding sentences not constructed to your specifications. Perhaps, if you were genuinely interested in the attempt at communication (purpose), someone else with better sentence construction could pipe in with such a translation. But, its doubtful from where I sit that you are truly interested in that...
I did succeed in the communication as per your subsequent weak reply to the essence (commnication substance). That was buried at the bottom of your previous reply. "I happen to know Omelet's location and climate but it's up to her to post any particulars." Again, read my previous reply. If you don't understand it, maybe someone can translate.
Pointing out grammatical and spelling errors is quite common when the replier was placed in a position that he/she may be incorrect, and may want to respond in a hateful manner as a result.. So, guess I'll overlook the majority of your response. Have a nice day.
--
Dave

If it looks like fish, smells like fish, its not
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Usually they are built some number of boards (or bricks) high. So if you make them two 8" or 10" boards high you can sit on the edge or sit on a stool on the path and lean over the bed, provided that they are not too wide, about 3-4 ft is good assuming access from both sides. It would be good to make a mock-up and see if your mobility permits you to access the bed comfortably before starting construction. Try kneeling or kneeling over a stool or crate (ie it supports your chest) as people find different postures comfortable. It is practical to make them desk high but you would be looking at more substantial construction as you are now building higher walls that have to hold back heavy wet soil.
There are timbers that will last for many years in contact with the soil. I would stay away from the heavily chemically treated sort - especially for a vege garden. Here in Australia suitable untreated timbers are among the native hardwoods, if you get the right sort your fence posts (or garden beds) will last 30-40 years in the ground. The building trade (here) has a rating system for timber called durability class which will guide you. I don't know where you are or what sort of timber is available so I cannot be specific. Concrete blocks will work too. As with many things the better solutions tend to be more expensive in the short term but may not be if you look at their total life.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's very practical to use waist high beds and they are becoming increasingly popular.
You don't mention where you live but you may be interested in seeing the following: http://www.knudsentanks.com.au/links.htm
I've seen these in use at a number of Open Gardens and been very impressed with the way they grew vegetables and flowers and allowed very elderly gardeners to continue to garden long after they had trouble bending down. I've seem then with plastic over to make mini greenhouses and bird netting over, and just left as beds. Very, very impressive and I want a number of them but have only recently managed to find them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Those are pretty spiffy bins! I used 10ft lengths of PVC pipe bent to arch over my raised beds. Think covered wagon. You can actually get clips that will hold materials to the pipe from greenhouse supply places. I used plastic early and late season, netting to keep the birds out of assorted yummy fruits and Remy (sp) cloth to keep out the bad bugs on certain crops. The plastic extended my growing season by at least two and in some cases three months and the netting saved all the strawberries for human consumption.
Val
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Aren't they just :-)) Very neat once in place and so light to bring into a garden.
I used 10ft lengths of PVC pipe bent to arch

Thats the sort of arch I make for putting shade cloth or bird netting over seedlings or fruit trees. I make arches out of 8 guage fencing wire for small covers and star pickets (Y posts in US speak) and 2 inch poly pipe for trees
You can actually get clips that

I use old boards or bricks or just baling twine to keep mine in place.
I used

I've used old net curtains when there has been a locust plague.

I have to keep Blue tongued lizards away from my strawbs - they eat them whole otherwise. It's a wonder any of us get produce given all the wildlife we ahve to keep from eating our crops.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

Why do you think so few crops in the stores are "organic"?
--
Peace! Om

"Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a Singer walking foot industrial sewing machine, and I'll be using it this year to make some shadecloth covers for parts of the garden as well as decorative canvas awnings.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Dang, I would have never thought of that. I am sure I can get some locally from ranchers, and perhaps get some plastic ones that are either damaged or old. We have a local AM radio program called Tradio, and you can call in for free.
Right now, I'm looking for an Aermotor windmill to power my backyard waterfall collection.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I belonged to a community group that spent two weekends a month building raised beds for the elderly and disabled. I think you are wise to consider raised beds now so you can continue gardening comfortably for many years to come.
Instead of going into lengthy descriptions I will suggest an excellent book. I'm sure your local library will have this as well as others or be able to order them if you don't want to purchase. I'm using the link to Amazon since they give pretty descriptions and reviews.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
At the bottom of that link are 'books you might also like'. You might want to check those out as well.
One of the most popular heights for raised beds we built was 18" high. These seemed to be easiest to garden while seated, depending on the size of the person. A sturdy garden stool or laying a board between the bed edges to form a bench is very comfortable way to garden. It was the most popular design for our seniors and those with leg and back problems. Desk height sounds good and logical but it won't take much for a plant to grow too tall to be easily managed and standing for long periods can become very tiring in some cases. We found two feet high turned out to be an awkward height for most people. Too high to sit and too low for bending. You just think you aren't bending but you are, causing even more back problems. That's why they tell mothers to *not* change the baby on a bed. Bending over repetitively at that angle is murder on the lower back. However the beds around the 2 foot mark was best for those in wheelchairs. Make sure you don't make the beds so wide you can't reach to tend them while sitting. And take into consideration if your wife is shorter than you to build these to the comfort to the smallest person. Tall people can always reach 'short', if one is small and/or short and having to reach 'tall' it can be very uncomfortable and frustrating. This is all in the book, you can customize depending on the height and reach of you and your wife and the lay of the land. We built the majority of the beds out of cinder block. They lasted indefinitely and the edge could also be used to sit on. Sometimes a bit more expense initially will save you dollars down the road, and you will have the pleasure of gardening for years to come.
Val
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

(Amazon.com product link shortened)
I got an L1 crush fracture July 4th when my ATV rolled on me. A month later, I tore a rib loose. I'm going to be doing some gardening basically standing up from now on. Will get the local strong teens and some church people to help me build these.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"SteveB" wrote:

I assume you mean a vegetable garden.
For tilling you'll still need to get up into the bed.

I think a foot or two is more practical, especially if you want more than a teensy vegetable garden.
The general formula in how-to books is to construct raised beds so that they are no higher and wider than you can comfortably reach to the center from each side... for most folks 24" X 30" high and 4' wide works well... if you make them sized so you need to do much stretching then you've defeated your purpose... with raised beds less is more. Keep in mind that many plants grow taller than you can reach were they planted at ground level, planted up in a raised bed you will need to climb into the bed... I think you'll be spending a lot of time/energy climbing in and out of raised beds
I honestly don't see the benefit to raised beds unless all you want is one or maybe two very small gardens as a fancy schmancy landscape feature but I don't think they are practical. There really isn't much bending with gardening anyways except for weeding. Weed block cloth takes care of that easily and costs far less than bed construction. And for harvesting low growing crops I find sitting on a small stool works fine, I have an assortment; one of those reversable kneeling- siting benches, a contractor bucket with swivel seat, a cheap Rubbermaid plastic step stool, and a few ordinary foam type cheapo kneeling cushions. I prefer to get in there with my plants and I don't like having to crowd plants because of limited space.
I would

Treated lumber works well and lasts many years, square fence posts are perfect... design your bed to accomodate standard length lumber, ie. make your bed 4' X 8", not 5' X 9'. I wouldn't suggest masonary if you live where the ground freezes, it will heave and crack. Also before you begin decide if you will need your bed fenced to keep critters out, if so regulation-type raised beds may not be what you want because any fence that keeps critters out will keep you out too. For my 50' X 50' vegetable garden I used real RR ties laid flat on the ground, even though used I'm sure they will outlast me. The ties really just delineate the garden, keeps the amended soil in and the yard soil out, keeps outside weeds from encroaching and gives me a solid base for attaching a sturdy deer fence, and a gate for me... also gives me an inside walkway around the entire perimeter.
Before you get too involved and begin buying construction materials give this raised bed idea a lot of consideration and reconsideration.
I used plain old fashioned RR ties:
http://i34.tinypic.com/2wp6ukz.jpg
My next door neighbor is a little fancier:
http://i34.tinypic.com/2dvsvvc.jpg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
g'day steve,
why till at all if you are going to do raised beds?
you can make them as high as you like almost, maybe for you around 2' to 3' tall depending on those who are going to use them.
keep the beds to about 3' wide.
we have pic's on how we do our beds on our site they may give you some ideas?
corrugated roofing makes for good sides not sure what roofing you have over there but any metal shet roofing might do, but you could use any materila you may get locally look in the demolition yards maybe? the beds probably aren't going to be cheap to set up due to the height you want but once done that is it then. the corrugated stuff is popular over here seems to last quiet a while.
the ones here are all premade beds just sit them on the ground and fill them, but for me i'd prefer loose sheets and galvanised star pickets, so if a sheet did corrode out then it would be easier to eitehr replace or fit another sheet over it.
blocks will cost because you need to lay a foundation first so they don't fall over.
wrote: snipped With peace and brightest of blessings,
len & bev
-- "Be Content With What You Have And May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In A World That You May Not Understand."
http://www.lensgarden.com.au /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wouldn't call yours raised beds, they're more like largish window boxes, flower pots if you will, filled with what's essentially potting mix.
Most folks who construct raised beds on top of real topsoil and fill with real topsoil till twice a year; fall and spring. Soil compacts and needs to be aerated and how else to amend nutrient depleted soil but to blend in fresh composted organic matter. I know that there are many lazy methods to revitaliz depleted soil, like spraying liquid fertilizers or sprinkling fertilizer pellets, but that doesn't make soil very much more productive than had nothing been done... perhaps with potting mix that method is better than nothing. Anyway it's no big deal to rototill a raised bed, with soil that's already been broken up it shouldn't take more than ten minutes each.

Nothing wrong with corrugated metal sides where you live but what you built won't work where winters are severe, the ground will freeze, heave that corrugated out of the ground and buckle that tin so much that come spring it will need to be hauled to the dump. It's important to realize that in gardening and construction what works well in one climate probably won't work at all in another.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thank you for another fine idea. I am going to pick up some 22 ga. corrugated metal tomorrow from a local Fabral plant. I can get all the scraps I want. Tomorrow, I will be picking up 8' lengths for a lean to shade. But I can have them trim them to most any length, and a bunch cut to length would be mighty handy.
Thanks again.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:
snipped

keep us informed would like to see pics of the finished product.
maybe send e/mail for more chat?
With peace and brightest of blessings,
len & bev
-- "Be Content With What You Have And May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In A World That You May Not Understand."
http://www.lensgarden.com.au /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Went to the next town today to pick up some 8' x 3' x 22 ga. bare steel corrugated drop remnants to make a lean to shade. These rust evenly on purpose giving them the aged look within six months. I got 22 of them for free, and tipped the man $40 to take his SO out to dinner. I told him I would like some more, so I will return there once I have the dimensions, and he will cut the remnants to length.
They even loaded them.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
g;day steve,
our plan is to use corrugated to raise our beds even more as we get older, probably initially we will get the lengths cut into 1/2 width, and use 6' galvanised star pickets as supports these pickets then can be used to support tomato's or trellises for beans etc.,.
for us those ready made frames mentioned in a link in another post are too expensive.
wrote: snipped With peace and brightest of blessings,
len & bev
-- "Be Content With What You Have And May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In A World That You May Not Understand."
http://www.lensgarden.com.au /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
len gardener wrote:

You can do that because you live in a semi tropical climate. But thin sheet metal cannot endure the heaving of freezing earth.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

After unloading the sheets for my shade cover, I have decided that it will do just fine to get about 3' (1 meter in your town) lengths, and then bury them about a foot with dirt tamped around the bottom. 2 x 4 (sorry, don't know the metric for that) tops to protect from the sharp edges, and some brackets to hold the wood together. Easy, cheap, and fast. If they rust out, I'll just do them again, or maybe even do a double layer to start.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.