Habanero peppers ..again

Last year I asked for advice on habanero peppers and they were a great success, in fact they have survived the winter on my window sill and are still producing small pea size peppers. My question is are habanero peppers biennial? If I give them a good feed will they produce another crop this year? I still have seeds left so intend to plant a new lot, but is it worth keeping the 'old' ones? Graham In Holland
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Don't know, but I had no luck with bringing plants in for the fall. The white bugs got control, and I could not debug them.
greg
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wrote:

Don't know, but I had no luck with bringing plants in for the fall. The white bugs got control, and I could not debug them.
greg ..............................................
I live in a flat so no garden, they were born from seed and still live on a south facing window sill. No bugs, I gave them liquid tomato feeding through the summer. Graham
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In tropical regions, habaneros are perennials.
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wrote:

Thanks, the Netherlands is not exactly tropical, I think I will keep the best one and plant again from seed 3 new pots. Graham
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Graham, as a general rule, if you can recreate their optimal environment, certain of the tropical pepper plants will easily continue to grow year'round. But new seed sometimes gives better options if you can't capture the right stage growth conditions to recycle the plant back to a veg growth state. From your pics you have a good window light setup, do you use supplemental lighting when you encounter North Sea low light conditions? also it appears you have good bottom heat( soil)... keep that to "cosy" for you and the plant should be fine but do just watch the RH, saucer pans of H2O nearby do well . Capsicum chinense like a bit more humidity than you would find in a Northern European winter room and a decent heat to finish in their grand fashion. But a tea kettle/pot on a radiator can work well and a good bit of long day lighting. Do look at the Rocoto ( black seed) peppers for your climate, also there is a Manazano ( a black seed also) developed in the mountains of NM that may be a good candidate for you to develop to your environment but there are also many other varietals in the below links. You do appear to have a good following of Pepper Heads in the Northland... Interesting, but not so surprising.
Good luck and let us see the final!
http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/hot_peppers.htm http://www.jungleseeds.com/SeedShop/Chilis.htm http://www.chileplants.com / http://www.chilepepperinstitute.org/chile_information.php
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wrote:

Graham, as a general rule, if you can recreate their optimal environment, certain of the tropical pepper plants will easily continue to grow year'round. But new seed sometimes gives better options if you can't capture the right stage growth conditions to recycle the plant back to a veg growth state. From your pics you have a good window light setup, do you use supplemental lighting when you encounter North Sea low light conditions? also it appears you have good bottom heat( soil)... keep that to "cosy" for you and the plant should be fine but do just watch the RH, saucer pans of H2O nearby do well . Capsicum chinense like a bit more humidity than you would find in a Northern European winter room and a decent heat to finish in their grand fashion. But a tea kettle/pot on a radiator can work well and a good bit of long day lighting. Do look at the Rocoto ( black seed) peppers for your climate, also there is a Manazano ( a black seed also) developed in the mountains of NM that may be a good candidate for you to develop to your environment but there are also many other varietals in the below links. You do appear to have a good following of Pepper Heads in the Northland... Interesting, but not so surprising.
Good luck and let us see the final! .............. Thanks for all your info, I have a full packet of seeds left from last year, and about 40 peppers in the deep freeze. So I am going to keep the best one alive, and grow 3 new pots. One thing I learned from last year, one seed one pot, last year I started with 2 in a pot and none were in the middle. I think I am the only person around here growing habaneros and eating them, I like hot peppers and a guy from Ariona said try habaneros. I received 3 requests about making pepper pastes last year, isn't this a nice group. How could I not hit the net to find Rocoto ( black seed) peppers? Pictures will follow. Graham
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Graham wrote:

Technically they are perennials but in any climate that does not have a warm/mild winter they are usually grown as annuals. You may find it easier to collect seeds in autumn and sow again in spring than baby them over winter. YMMV
David
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In central Texas, I had a couple of habaneros that lasted four years in a pot. I'd bring them in in the winter & take them outside in the warmer months. At the 4th year, they looked pretty ragged, so I stuck them into the ground, where they perked right up, but I didn't re-pot them again. I guess the potting soil was just spent. They did continue to produce peppers, but the fruit was smaller every year.
Robert

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