?? Grasshopper Control

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Nosema locustae. Anyone have experience with them?
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Derald
FL USDA zone 9a
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Derald wrote:

is that the regular grasshopper? 3 inches or so long?
if so, yes, the snakes, bluebirds, turkeys and frogs eat them. we have some around all the time but they don't do enough damage for me to worry about. i like how they change their color to suit the background.
do you have lizards down there you can encourage? set up some birdbaths (but don't feed the birds) and keep them cleaned out and filled. even if the small birds can't manage the bigger grasshoppers they can reduce the population.
songbird
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If that is the insect that goes by the common name of 'locust', then yes, I do have experience of plagues of them.
The only thing I found that works is Molasses spray (I only use 'organic' sprays in my veg garden though). I can't give you a recipe though as the notebook that has that recipe in it apears to have gone walkabout. I'm sure you'll find a recipe online easily enough.
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I have no idea whatsoever about how or why it works, but I do know that it did the only times I've used it - 2 or three times from memory.
They just didn't seem to like eating where I'd sprayed it which was all over the veg garden. there were still masses of them out in the rurrounding paddocks where the stock were and lots in the chooks orchard (where the chooks had a field day) but there were far, far less of them in my veg garden.
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wrote:

It was just molasses dissolved in water (that much I do recall), but I don't recall the proportions - perhaps 10%????. And the reason why I tried it was that I had a huge buket of molasses left over form either the horses or the cattle so I didn't waste any money on it either ;-))
I've

Ducks are much less damaging - they tread on things rather than scratching them out as do chooks. Mind you, both do some damage.
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.net says...

To clarify, 'You want to know if anyone has used the microsporidian pathogen "Nosema locustae" (aka Nolo) as a control for grasshoppers and crickets.'
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phorbin wrote:

:) funny, funny, just found out the same thing.
and so my answer is no. haven't ever used them directly. looks to be a lot of studies out there on this one so plenty of good reading available already.
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Derald wrote:

:) s'ok. we get it figured out eventually.
songbird
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Derald wrote:

http://www.epa.gov/oppbppd1/biopesticides/ingredients/factsheets/factsheet_117001.htm
http://www.cabi.org/FC/Default.aspx?site 3&page@73&LoadModule=GlossaryModule&GlossaryID41&WebSiteCode1=QF the unfortunate answer to most research on pest control and uses of any other organism to control it is that we just don't know everything. it would take an infinite amount of resources to find out. most people don't care they just want the problem species gone and screw the collateral damage.
songbird
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most people don't care they just want the

In the case of locusts/grsshoppers taht would be an incredibly stupid stance to take. Birds which can be so easily the victim of 'collateral damage' or often THE best solution for gettign rid of garden insects.
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Farm1 wrote:

i know. that's why i asked Derald if he had bluebirds around (not bluejays). from his previous descriptions he has prime open field habitat for several families of bluebirds.
a few managed boxes would help his grasshopper and other insect control situation out quite a bit.
keeping bird baths filled and cleaned out once in a while for them will keep them in the area too.
we don't have bird houses up specifically for them, but they come through for the birdbaths pretty much every day during the summer. as they eat about 70% insects most of the bug season they do a great deal of picking about and hunting. we see them wrestling grasshoppers in the gravel quite a bit. funny as some of those hoppers about half as big as they are.
songbird
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Derald wrote:

ok, still might be worth trying some birdbaths and see what happens. it being hot and dry where you are at in the mid-summer you might still lure them into the garden area from the surrounding open areas.

:) i'll take a look at it.
around here a mowed field is asking for dandelion, crab grass, etc. invasion.
songbird
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.net says...

OK... If you haven't done so before, you might look into bacillus thuringensis Israelensis dunks.
London ON uses it to control the mosquito vector of the West Nile Virus.
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.net says...

<G> These days my attention is so taken with politics (bad guys in power in Canada) that its no surprise I missed it. -- I need a vacation or maybe my hands stuffed in gloves and locked to a wall for a few days and/or maybe a nap or fifteen or maybe a regimen of bacopa monnieri to improve the little grey cells.

They don't seem to object to their own floaters in the bathing pool.

Likely BT Israelensis.
They used to spray here but gave it up years ago.

Me too. I hate participating in the grand experiment designed to make insects impossible to kill. That said, the only other way I can think of to deal with the problem mosquitos present is by immunizing us to the mosquito borne diseases.
Just try to get government to move on this one. -- In Canada anyhow.
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Billy

E Pluribus Unum
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In article <wildbilly-7A8B9E.12033421022012@c-61-68-245-

Yeah... I know. They're working on it.
It remains to be seen whether or not they'll find one that seems more than promising and conveys immunity.
I'm pretty sure that doesn't nullify my comment regarding immunity being the fundamental solution to mosquito borne disease.
If we're resistant or mostly resistant, the need to kill off the species may be less keenly felt.
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No argument, it's just that I've never heard of immunization against anything but viruses.
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Billy

E Pluribus Unum
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Billy wrote: ...

dang i wish i'd not taken the microbiology book back last week. :)
i'm pretty sure there are different targets possible for immunization. after all it is a system of tagging things "NOT ME" to be removed. bacteria, virus, mycoplasmid, phage, prion, DNA fragments or other cellular debris...
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Billy wrote:

There's been an article per year on it in Scientific American for the last several years. It's near the top of diseases that kill or disable worldwide so the Gates Foundation had been pouring a lot of money into the effort. They have R&D projects going for the top 5 diseases at least. Immunization is the second most effective advance in medical history with only plumbing ahead of it. Developing vaccines is no longer profitable enough for the commercial companies to do so the Gates Foundation is going to save a vast number of lives in the future.

It's hard because malaria has a very complex life cycle. I would have thought that would make it easy because there are more steps that can be interrupted.

In this case that means either the humans bitten by the mosquitos are immune or that the mosquitos are immune. There have been releases of mosquitos immune to Hanta virus to test that second optoin.

There are vaccines against bacterial diseases as well. Less common but they are available. And isn't cholera a protist? When I was in the military I was given a vaccine against that just before one of my brief deployments overseas.
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Thanks, Doug. Cholera is bacterium Vibrio cholerae.
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Billy

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