grafting a nectarine (espalier)

grafting a nectarine (espalier)
Hi,
I have an espaliered nectarine. It is a simple shape consisting of a single vertical trunk and a series of horisonlat branches.
Last year I lost a couple of the branches due to a hail storm.
I was hoping that this spring I would see new shoots come from the base of the original (damaged) branches. This has not been the case and would like to either graft some new growth to the trunk with the aim to replace the branch, or if there is some other way to stimulate new shoots I would be happy to do that.
Can anyone help me.
thanks
james
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james wrote:

That's not an easy one. Grafting a nectarine is most successful with a bud graft. You could try placing buds on the trunk where you need a graft but I'm not so sure it will do what you want it to. Budding works to make a new tree because you bend over then, later, cut off the old top giving the graft a reason to grow. You can't do that in your situation. If the bud grows at all, it will probably grow slowly and stay smaller than the other branches. I would cut the other branches back quite a bit (they will grow back). Cut back to a good bud or small side branch that will grow back where you want it. Maybe that will stimulate new branches about where you need them, eliminating the need to do the grafts. You may have to compromise and take any new growth that is at all close to where you want it. For example, you might get growth near the base of one of the other branches. If you can train it to grow into the space where there is a missing branch, call it good enough.
Steve
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