Frozen Lima Beans

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This week the local supermarket has frozen veges on sale $1 for one pound package. I was surprised to find that the regular price for Lima Beans is $3.99. Maybe I'll plant some this season in addition to my regular row of string beans.
Are they hard to grow?
What are some easy recipes?
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Not hard to grow, but they take a long time to mature, so less turnaround per acre, more money charged.

Google for "lima beans with mint". I had a recipe years ago, can't find it now.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

George
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George Shirley wrote:

Are butter beans really the same thing as limas? I thought they were different, and I certainly seem to think that I have a preference for butter beans over lima beans. (Hopefully I'm not crazy and basing my preference only on the name when the actual food is no different. That would be embarrassing.)
Is it possible this is one of those things where several varieties go by the same name? When I was a kid, I told everyone I hated green beans, except Del Monte brand, which I liked. Everyone told me I was nuts and that they were all the same thing, until one day I happened to mention this to my grandfather (who was a food broker and thus knew a bit more about green beans than the average person), and instead of telling me I was nuts he said, "Well, Del Monte only cans Blue Lake variety. It could be that you like Blue Lake variety green beans and not the others." Sure enough he was right -- I found some store brand Blue Lake green beans and they were the good stuff.
The point being, maybe the terms "butter beans" and "lima beans" actually do refer to something slightly different. Anyone have any further information or insights?
- Logan
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Not technically the same. The term is used kind of like "broad beans" I think. I can't recall the taxonomy but, in my experience, butter beans are a different species. The ones we've grown are kind of brownish, not green like limas. And btw, fresh Blue Lake string beans are among my favorites too.
Emma
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Lima beans in Asia is white; alos avaialble at American grocery store in dry form.
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Some interesting information here:
http://sarasota.extension.ufl.edu/FCS/FlaFoodFare/Butter_Beans.htm
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"Chloe" wrote:

Why you find it interesting I've no idea, I find it intersting in that it contains incorrect information.
For correct bean information go here: http://www.americanbean.org
And here:
lima bean [LY-muh] This New World bean was named for Lima, Peru, where it was found as early as 1500. There are two distinct varieties of lima - the Fordhook and the baby lima (and Fordhooks are not adult baby limas). Both are pale green, plump-bodied and have a slight kidney-shape curve. The Fordhook is larger and plumper than the baby lima. It also has a fuller flavor than its smaller relative. Fresh limas are available from June to September. They're usually sold in their pods, which should be plump, firm and dark green. The pods can be refrigerated in a plastic bag for up to a week. They should be shelled just before using. Frozen lima beans are available year-round and are labeled according to variety (Fordhook or baby). Canned and dried limas are usually labeled "jumbo," "large" or "small," a designation that relates to size and not variety. In the South, dried limas are frequently referred to as butter beans . When mottled with purple they're called calico or speckled butter beans . A traditional way to serve limas is with corn in SUCCOTASH. They're also used alone as a side dish, in soups and sometimes in salads. Lima beans contain a good amount of protein, phosphorus, potassium and iron. The lima is also called the Madagascar bean . See also BEAN.
Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.
--
Sheldon


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I love lima beans.
Put some in a cereal bowl, add a bit of water, cover with a saucer, and microwave them for 5 or 6 minutes or until tender.
It can't get much easier than that!
Don
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Don K wrote:

garlic, and a link of smoked sausage and simmer until dinner time. Eat over rice or Arkansas cornbread or just plain with a little homemade hot sauce. Filling, rich in fiber, cheap to buy and cook, tastes good too. I like them better than the fresh ones.
George
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On Sat, 03 Mar 2007 08:56:00 -0600, George Shirley

*drool*
Guess I'm running to the store before dinner....
Penelope
--
You have proven yourself to be the most malicious,
classless person that I've encountered in years.
  Click to see the full signature.
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Penelope Periwinkle wrote:

Me too, I forgot about dried limas. I have all the stuff to make this, will put the limas on my shopping list. Thanx George...!!!
--
Best
Greg




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Gregory Morrow wrote:

cheap.
George
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George Shirley wrote:

This is the kind of stuff we ate often when growing up, I grew up by the Mississippi in Illinois so at times we had lotsa catfish, smoked sturgeon, river/lake perch, carp, plus whatever we had from the garden (I remember being a real tiny kid and eating fried rabbit and squirrel that my older brothers had hunted). Now this kind of stuff can be seen on big - city fancy resto menus, it's "deconstructed" and then reconstructed (more often than not it's more like "misconstrued") as "American Classic Cuisine" and served at 20++ bucks per plate (and a miniscule portion to boot). When I was a kid nobody told us it was "poor food"...
Gawd I cringe when I see morel mushrooms in the stupormarket here in Chicawgo for $39.95/lb, when I was a kid we'd pick gunnysacks full and we gave most away, if you had charged for them you would have been dragged off and committed to the County Home...
:-)
--
Best
Greg




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Don K wrote:

How about "Easy #2"?
I like Lima beans with cottage cheese on the side. Doesn't need much dressing up - just a touch of salt on both and some black pepper on the cottage cheese. I can make a very filling meal out of that with only two ingredients.
Rick
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You don't find cottage cheese already salty enough? Does the cottage cheese making process require so much salt or is it just a common practice?
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My dad makes his own lima bean, rice, and tomato stew that he serves fairly frequently as a side dish when I visit my parents for dinner. My dad takes whole tomatoes from his garden or store bought, cuts them up and slowly simmers them in a big pot of water with some spices until he gets a sauce, then he adds canned lima beans, white rice, and some other vegies, simmers the mixture more. The result is a vegetable stew that he really enjoys. I am not a big lima bean fan so I seldom eat any of it, but my folks enjoy it a lot and its very easy, but time consuming to slowly simmer the stew.
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I've never seen frozen limas, either baby or Fordhook, for over $2.50/lb. $4 a pound is shocking. I usually get the regular Fordhook limas since I find the baby ones kind of tasteless and mushy. Here in my part of the midwest, they're on sale once or twice a year for $1/bag. We love them so I usually buy ten bags when they're on sale. In the garden, we usually plant pole limas since they are a long-season crop. They usually do well but last year, with the drought, ours failed and the deer managed to overcome our defense system. For growing, I recommend the Christmas/speckled pole variety and sturdy tripods at lest 6 feet high. We'd had very good luck with that one.
We like ours plain with just butter or mixed with corn cut off the cob (especially grilled corn). Just a tiny bit of bacon added during cooking gives them a lot of flavor. Fresh limas, right out of the garden, are just fabulous.
Emma
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I really hope someday to have the opportunity to have fresh limas. The same goes for blackeyed peas.
Steve
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On Mar 3, 12:57�pm, snipped-for-privacy@speedymail.org (Steve Pope) wrote:

If you're going to cook them you'd be hard pressed to tell the difference between fresh picked and fresh frozen, in fact it can't be done. The only way to appreciate fresh picked beans of any type is to eat them raw, in salads or marinated. Except for some ethnic markets you won't usually find fresh hull beans in the produce section simply because few people are going to eat raw fresh beans. Most people will only eat them cooked, so they may as well buy fresh frozen.
Sheldon
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