Coffee grounds

Has anybody had experience with using coffee grounds as mulch? Ha
anybody used them for adding organic matter
-- Ken Lichtsinn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have made quite extensive use of coffee grounds as a grass mulch under hedges, as an isulating layer on gardens over winter, as a soil conditioner, as a fertiliser and in compost.
good as a mulch, dependent on what you want the mulch to do. To deter weeds you will need to pile in on quite thickly but it will do a good job. As a soil conditioner or to preserve a tilth during winter also very good. Grounds will sit around for several months as a layer on top of the soil and decompose. They stick together quite nicely on the top whilst near the bottom they compost. The top may get dry and crusty whereas near the bottom the grounds remain moist. You will get a bit of mold but that doesn't seem to be a problem. A decent mulch of grounds on a garden over autumn will leave a nice moist fertile planting bed by spring. I have used them for several seasons on a number of my gardens & have witnesses the results.
As a source of organic matter also very good from my observation. Aside from the insulating elements described above, they do add organic matter, encourage worms and have some fertiliser benefits (in approx + ratios to animal poops). Mulch one of your gardens over autumn with 1-2 inchs (or more if you want) and observe the changes in soil characteristics through winter and in to early spring.
I also use them on the lawn as a fertiliser. They have to be broken up & spread thinly mind. Some people reckon they are acidic but from what I have read most of the acidity will have been extracted through the coffee making process & mild amounts of coffee grounds will have minimal effect on decent soil. If you have acidic soil you will likely lime or use wood ask anyway so the grounds will be little effect.
And best of the best, they are free as a fart & readily available from any local cafe.
rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Waiting for similar answer. I've got a cylindrical shaped metal trash can with a plastic liner. I've been dumping coffee grounds with filter in that can since February. I drink about a pot a morning. Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave wrote:

Problem is, if you do vermiculture, and you don't throw the grounds out one day, they will come into the house and take the grounds on their own. After that, they lie on top of the bin and spell out Starbucks with their bodies. Fair warning.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@virus.net writes:

A year or two ago, I read an article citing that a university in Hawaii had discovered, while concentrating on a different issue, that fresh coffee grounds deter slugs; apparently it was related to the caffeine. You can probably Google it University of Hawaii + coffee grounds and find it.
Coffee grounds would make an excellent addition to the soil (used or fresh); I also read they are good in strawberry beds, likely the slug issue again.
In our area, Starbucks leaves the coffee grounds in a basket for customers to take for their gardens.
Glenna

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Lotta rock and caliche out here. My backyard is on the uphill side. House is on a side of a hill. Front yard is decent. Backyard is fighting native grasses/weeds. Got topsoil from the house halfway to the fenceline in the back. This soil transition line is where the fighting is. You may be thinking, why don't I drop some more topsoil there? Can't do too much topsoil in the back at once, it will wash to the house. Spent all late winter and spring doing the front including bringing in more topsoil and building retaining wall. Its now hot, and I'm tired. Will drop all them coffee grounds on the transition line, see what happens.
My garden has billions of jalapenos (fruit), a few watermelons. The cantaloupe may succumb to the heat. They're flowering though. Cross-pollination may be interesting.
One question, how do I tame the watermelon? They string all over the place. Just cut them to length? Don't want to shock them into not growing at all. Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave wrote:

There's a recipe in there. Probably give you the runs though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Aug 7, 6:07 pm, Ken Lichtsinn <Ken.Lichtsinn.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.