Blossom end rot

I've been getting what I believe is blossom end rot on my tomatoes. Being a novice gardener I'm unsure just what is normal tomato growth. Seems like the tomatoes stop growing at a certain point and after several weeks the bottom of the tomato turns very dark.
I added eggshells in the bottom of the hole when they were planted, and I've upped the amount of water they are getting.
Is there something else?
Is it normal for tomatoes to just stop growing? (Big Boy and Better Boy and they are about 2" or so...)
Jeff
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wrote:

Temperature:85F/55F (good), or 90F+/76F+ (this not good), Water: Water evenly when top inch of soil is dry. Hours of sunshine: 5-6 hr. Sun during middle of the day (min.), 16 hr.(max) Fertilizer: 3 lbs 5-10-10/100 sq.ft.
Most common reason for blossom drop is uneven watering. Usually tomatoes grow profusely. It's turning color that takes forever, or so it seems.
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On Sun, 26 Jul 2009 01:57:43 -0400, jeff wrote:

No one has figured it out completely. Add lime to your soil supposedly helps. Prepare your soil before you ever plant anything, compost does wonders. I have always watered once a week, a good soaking. Mind, this is not pot growing and I rather do organic than use fertilizer.
--
Bud

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Of my 18 plants and 5 varieties, I've had BER on two plants. About a dozen tomatoes on a Black Krim and two on a Caspian Pink had BER. They are all together in the same plot, and get watered and fertilized alike.
I've picked four ripe ones so far, with a few to be ready for picking in a few days. I'm in metro Denver, CO. If we have a long season, I should have a high yield.
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I am wondering, is it okay to eat these tomatoes? I usually pitch mine into the compost, but sometimes I catch the kids eating them (not the brown part). If it's okay to eat the rest of the tomato, I'll go ahead and let them. --S.
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is a calcium deficiency, either lack of same or the plants inability to process (uneven watering). Also, it does appear that some varieties (pineapple for me) are more susceptible than others. Hope this helps, Steve
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wrote in message

Great! The kids can eat the "culls," and I can take the good ones inside.

I see it happening only on my Romas, and then only on those that grow on two specific plants. I'll check to see if those two drippers are messed up somehow. --S.
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