Aging manure

I have some horse manure that has been sitting in a barn for over a year. Is it composted enough to add to my garden this year or does it need to be in contact with soil organisms to compost safely?
Sincerely,
Stuart Pedazzo...but you can call me Stu!
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Stuart Pedazzo wrote:

I've even put fresh manure in the garden. I usually start loading up the garden over the winter with fresh stuff and stop when I till the garden for the first time.
Mary
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Stuart Pedazzo said:

If it has been sitting in the barn all this time, it might actually be sort of mummified rather than aged. What it needs to compost is moisture and, ideally, air. It might also need some nitrogen as some of what it had to start with volitilized away.
I actually helped someone clear out a barn full of old, dried out manure once, and hauled the stuff home (in bags) in my Chevette hatchback!
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

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The only real way to find out is to taste it. Is it bitter?? Does it taste like crap? if so, its not ready yet.

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