Addition to Tire Gardening Report

     I've made some minor additions/corrections to the Tire Gardening Report and one quite significant addition, which I'll copy below for your convenience. (I know there are at least a few people here interested in tire gardening.)
The entire report may be seen at:
http://www.meadows.pair.com/tiregarden.html
The significant addition follows. I really don't see how I could have forgotten to include this one!
Pat
------------- The last - but not least important - advantage to tire gardening is that I just plain *like* it. In my opinion, it's very good psychologically because you can take everything in small bites, and it never feels overwhelming.
It's easy to become paralyzed into inactivity if you feel you need to plant (or weed, or turn the soil) in an entire garden, for example, but one tire is no problem at all.
Then after you've done just one tire, you want to do another ...and another. It nicely breaks the work up into small and manageable bites. Mel Bartholomew stresses these points in his book 'Square Foot Gardening' [1], and they apply to tire gardening as much as they do to square-foot gardening.
Tire gardening makes record-keeping for crop rotations very easy as well: I can record what we planted in Row #3, Tire #2, for example, very easily. No diagrams necessary, just a simple listing of the row and tire numbers and their contents.
If I had kept records of the harvest from each tire, this would be useful in the future too (must do this next year!). For example, if two tires full of Swiss chard aren't enough, then the following year I'll know I need to plant three or more tires of Swiss chard.
I can also plan for succession crops easily: for example, it takes six weeks from seed to harvest for lettuce. If I always want to have one tire's worth of lettuce available, I can just plant one tire of lettuce every week for six weeks, then repeat the process.
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I use cushion planters - cut out polyurethane foam cushions. You can leave the bottom in or not as you choose. Of course, you can custom make the soil. I use amended garden dirt generally. They are great for low growing plants - thymes, parsley etc. Some look like rocks; others are less attractive.
They are not ugly like garden tires. Has anyone tried tires painted with roofing cement and then covered with peat moss and other materials.
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