urgent paving advice please


Hi Group
I have a small dug garden area with a crazy paved path across it, which shows no sign of cracking or upheaval.
I want to pave over the entire area, including where the path is, with new paving slabs, 600x 300 size.
It will save a lot of work if I leave the path well alone, and make a hard core layer on the garden around the path, and to the same level, and then lay new slabs across the lot.
Is there a problem with laying new paving directly onto the old existing path?
I anticipate using the method of a dollop of concrete under each corner of the new slabs. the new area will only be for human use - not to have heavy motors on it, for example.
any advice appreciated
Ian
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If there are no cracks or visible settlement in the crazy paving which has clearly been down for a while, leave it well alone.
The only possible problem may be differential settlement. i.e. if the hardcore area isn't as strong as the crazy paving, over time you may notice settlement of your new paviours in these areas, and some cracking. This is a serious problem with bridge structures (my day job) but unlikely to be an issue for you as long as you compact properly.
As for dabs of mortar, make it five, like a dice. This method doesn't work so well with skinny slabs less than 35mm thick. In that case either use a dry sand cement mix about 7/1, or a thin mortar bed all over, about 5/1 should be sufficient. I prefer the latter, it gives a great solid finish if done properly, dry sand/cement can be difficult for the layman(like me!) esp getting slabs to bed firmly. Mortar bed doesn't have to be solid, I generally cut it up with a trowel so it looks like tile grout, then press slabs into place.
Good luck
Al
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Al wrote:

The oft neglected point about the "5-spot method" is that properly done (big dabs not minging fist sized dabs) you end up with virtually a complete bed as the mortar spots coalesce as the slab is pressed down. It makes it far easier for the lay-man (groan) toget the levels right - dry bed is a bugger to do for the amateur.
pk
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thanks for the advice Ian

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