Sealing a lean-to conservatory


The conservatory is leaking. It's a wooden, Edwardian, lean-to style, which joins the garage (yes, that converted one) on one side, and the rear of the house on the other.
At the point where it joins the walls, it seems that the flashing (if that's what it's called - a wide strip of sticky looking black tape) is failing.
Q1 - what's the best, and safest way to get onto that conservatory? I cannot see any fixings into the walls (but they may, I guess, be covered by the existing flashing). I know I'll need to use some system of crawl boards, but I'm petrified that my 15st will come crashing through.
Q2 - what's my options for re-sealing these edges? Obviously the old stuff will need to come off. Will it come away cleanly, or need burning off or something? Is there anything better than this 'tape' that I can use to re-seal it following removal?
Cheers
JW
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John Whitworth wrote:

You may need scaffolding, if you want to do it safely.

The 'tape' as you call it is ideal unless you want to go to the effort of cutting lead flashing into the pointing. I did some 15 years ago and it's still like new. I would have thought that re-applying the sealing mastic on top of the old (having removed as much as possible) would work OK.
Rob Graham
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Thanks Rob. Given the rain we've had today, I've decided I'll get a pro to do it - and quickly. If they go through the conservatory, then I'll be after their insurer! ;-)
I will see what the different estimates are for mastic vs. lead. I've actually found the original construction booklet that the previous owner left us, and it shows lead flashing being used.
Cheers
JW
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On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 10:25:09 +0000, John Whitworth wrote:

=============================================== The sticky tape ('Evostik Flashband' or possibly an own brand version from Wickes etc.) is usually quite effective especially when used in conjunction with the correct primer. However its success depends on the soundness of the mortar joints. If the mortar is crumbly rain water can travel through the mortar behind the Flashband. If this is likely to happen (test the mortar in a few places) then you'll make a much better job using more conventional lead flashing cut into the wall by about 1".
Cic.
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Ah - thanks. That sounds like exactly what has happened. I have noticed that the mortar is very crumbly throughout most of the garage.
Do you have any idea what I should be expecting to pay for that to be done by a pro? About 6 metres of flashing to be done.
Cheers
JW
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On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 20:51:58 +0000, John Whitworth wrote:

=============================================== Sorry, I have no idea of price (I'm not a professional - just DIY) but I think it could be quite expensive if it needs scaffolding, although many pros will work off *safe* crawler boards.
I think it would be worth hiring or buying a small access tower and doing the job yourself in stages.
Cic.
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I think it just needs a strut of some sort inside, to give extra stability to the overhead timbers.
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On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 21:29:06 +0000, John Whitworth wrote:

=============================================== If you're happy with that kind of arrangement 'Acrow' building props would give very adequate support (with load spreaders on top) but you would need to ensure that they couldn't fall over. They're quite cheap to hire and frequently crop up for sale second hand. Plan this carefully - falling through a glass roof could be painful!
Cic.
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Great - thanks - I'll look into those.
It's a [very noisy] polycarbonate roof - but the ground still hurts when being reunited to it! ;-)
John
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